5 votes

What is the correct way to punctuate direct questions that are not quotes?

Those "not-quotes" are quotes. You may not be quoting anyone specifically, but you are quoting a sentence someone might ask. Thus it needs to be punctuated as though someone had asked it. A ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
  • 2,258
3 votes
Accepted

"I've been to see the manager" -- meaning of "been to see"

In the sentence, the phrase "been to see" indicates that the speaker has visited or met with the manager. It implies a physical presence in the manager's office or location for the purpose ...
Fateme Mirjalili's user avatar
2 votes

Where am I taking this to?

It isn't related to "where"; it's related to the verb "to be". When you answer the question, you still need to use the preposition. I'm from ... In the first sentence, if you ...
Style's user avatar
  • 360
2 votes

Does 'Service with exception' look native to English speakers?

This is meaningless. It probably relates to "service" (perhaps a mistake for "server", for example a web server) and an "exception" (an condition that occurs in running ...
James K's user avatar
  • 213k
1 vote
Accepted

What does this question on the application form mean?

"Reasonable accommodations" is a phrase taken out of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and used in other countries too. It refers to things that the employer might have to do differently ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 4,211
1 vote

{Do you see/Did you see/Have you seen} him yet? Which tense is correct?

"...ask her if she saw that guy..." You answer your own question here. To talk about the past, use a past tense. The simplest is the preterite "saw", which (with do support) is &...
James K's user avatar
  • 213k

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