10

Does it still not work? Alternatives are: Is it still not working? Is it still out of order? Is it fixed yet?


3

Let's look at the definitions first: Interrogative Pronouns: The main interrogative pronouns are "what," "which," "who," "whom," and "whose." Interrogative pronouns are used to ask questions. Do not confuse interrogative pronouns with interrogative determiners (called "interrogative adjectives" in traditional grammar), which look the same as ...


2

Beginning a question with the construction "Could you tell me if/how/when/what ..." is deemed to be more polite. In addition, the second form is not good syntax. It would be better to say "How does renting this flat work?", but it is still a bit direct. You could end it with ", please?" to improve it. In fact, "You could" or "Could you" is often used to ...


2

You can definitely use "there" in questions as you've used it here -- "What is there on Broadway?" and "What is on Broadway?" mean the same thing, though the first seems a smidge more natural/idiomatic to me. That said, if someone asked me "What's on Broadway?", absent some other context, I would interpret the speaker to be asking "What shows are currently ...


2

From my experience, the following four would definitely be among the most common ways to say that and they probably would be at the very top of the list: Did you hear that? What was that? What's that sound? What's that noise?


2

The form you have proposed is not correct and not idiomatic in English. To express the idea behind it, you can say: "How can I decide which book to read fully, and which to read [only] a summary of?" Another possibility is: "How can I decide which book to read fully, and which book to read only as a summary."


2

How old are you in this picture? is OK (the picture shows you at a certain age). If you use the past tense, it's better to say How old were you when this picture was taken?


1

It's odd and would be considered a mistake. The "tag question" should be You added me, didn't you? Since the question form is "Did you add me." and not "Wasn't it you that added me" If you said It was you that added me, wasn't it? That is a correct sentence. According to Michael Harvey, adding 'isn't it?' or 'wasn't it?' after any positive ...


1

There's no special rule about adding an 's' for questions, it simply depends on the "person" of the verb, e.g.: Singular Plural 1 I teach we teach 2 you teach you teach 3 he, she, it teaches they teach If the the referent is singular, e.g. "a national program", use "teaches." If the the referent is plural, e....


1

Yes, it can. "There is" is used to say that something exists. In this construction, the word "there" does not mean a place. Example: "There is a shopping mall on Broadway." To ask whether something exists, you can say "Is there ...?" Example: "Is there a subway station on Broadway?" Answer: "There is a subway station on Broadway." - or "Yes." To ask which ...


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