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Option 1: When will the contract be awarded? is the correct order. When asking a question like this, the word "will" will almost always come after who, what, where, when, why, or how (if the word "will" is in the sentence). For example, you would say, "Where will the event take place", "Who will host the meeting today?", "What will we be doing later?", "Why ...


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It had to be me, hadn't it? It had to be me, didn't it? I think both are correct.But Americans might prefer didn't it? The British might prefer__ hadn't it?_ Though had and have are main verbs The British might use have and had in the question tags. Since have and had are considered main verbs, Americans might prefer the helping verbs do and did ...


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It is acceptable and common to use "they" (and derivatives like possessive "their") as gender-neutral pronouns and determiners: Who is eating their lunch? Some writers prefer to avoid pronouns and determiners altogether where possible in unknown-gender cases. You could simply write: Who is eating lunch?


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Have/ has + subject+ past participle.( question.) Subject+ have/ has+ past participle.(statement.) Have you found? You have found.


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The question would be: What do you wish was easy? And then you could respond with: I wish English was easy


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While one can think of a question as being derived from a statement, a native sp3aker does not typically first construct a statement and then transform it into a question. Similarly, while a question like your original example: What value of T is just small enough to make the bulb light? can be thought of as being an elided form, constructions of the ...


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The noun subjects in your example full-form sentences are in the wrong location. A native English speaker would never say "is not it?", but rather "is it not?". The same goes for example 2 where the correct form would be "Are you not...." The corrected subject-verb full-form versions can be a little awkward (when placed at the end of a sentence, this phrase ...


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How/What is the weather forecast? Welcome to ELL. I have heard people use both "How" and "What" when asking about the weather, but the phrasing of the sentences differ quite a bit. We say How is the weather outside? How was the weather in NYC? How is the weather in ...? Here, we are asking the person if the weather is warm, hot, sunny, cold, windy, ...


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