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33 votes
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What is the correct term "back-end", "back end" or "backend"?

I don't think you're going to be corrected or admonished for using any of these three. Google understands you perfectly no matter how you type it. Wikipedia features all three as well. Personally, I'...
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32 votes
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Should I hyphenate "Thank You"

Ah, I presume you mean you looked up thank-you, which is an existing noun but not the same thing at all as the common idiom thank you. Merriam-Webster tells us: Full Definition of THANK-YOU : a ...
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  • 24.8k
24 votes

Is the use of "9-sibling" and "13-year" in the sentence below correct?

You should not use hyphens in these instances. We do not hyphenate such noun phrases when they are used in ordinary nominal contexts such as object of a preposition or argument (subject, object, ...
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24 votes

What is the correct term "back-end", "back end" or "backend"?

You can Spell it as back end when used as a noun, as for example "I am working on the back end of a project", and Spell it as back-end when used as an adjective, as for example "The back-end ...
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22 votes
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Spelling "brute force"

You have four examples due to how the words are being used differently in each case. The noun phrase “brute force” describes the raw strength used to achieve or get through something. For example: "...
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  • 336
21 votes
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When can I hyphenate "in-place"?

Quick answer for general use: hyphenation is for adjectives, not adverbs: They sheltered in place. [no hyphen] The dancers twirl in place. [no hyphen] The in-place sheltering command was given at ...
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  • 35k
20 votes

Should a suspended hyphen be used for '10-to 15-year-olds'?

Yes, the hyphen should follow 10. In addition, a space should follow this hyphen, indicating that 10- is attached to year-..., not to to: ...the time spent by 10- to 15-year-olds on two activities ...
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16 votes
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When do we add a hyphen (-) to a complex adjective word?

This is not a question of grammar, but of style. Writers use hyphens with compound adjectives to avoid ambiguity so that the reader does not have to read and re-read a sentence to garner the meaning ...
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  • 14.3k
14 votes

Is the use of "9-sibling" and "13-year" in the sentence below correct?

No. Firstly: neither phrase needs a hyphen. The use of hyphens can be tricky, but here the relevant rule is that they are used to make compound modifiers. Use a hyphen to link a modifier to another ...
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  • 6,593
13 votes
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"6-foot tall" or "6-feet tall"?

When a measurement is used right before the noun it measures, use a hyphen and the singular form of the unit of measurement: I saw a 95-foot yacht in the harbor. The 12-mile climb is too arduous ...
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  • 2,108
13 votes
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Is it correct to say "how-many-day a tour was it"?

"How many days was the tour" is the only option there that is correct. I'd still definitely prefer to use "how long was the tour". Edit: as Jack said, option 2 "How many days ...
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  • 907
11 votes

When do we add a hyphen (-) to a complex adjective word?

Robusto's answer is correct, I'm just adding another thought. You asked: Is this a case of people making a grammatical mistake or are both forms completely correct and it's just a matter of ...
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  • 5,494
9 votes

Should I hyphenate "Thank You"

Thank you contains a verb(thank) linked to an object(you). This is how we normally thank people. For ex: "[I/we] thank you for being here." Like many other phrases, this commonly used phrase was ...
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9 votes

What is the correct term "back-end", "back end" or "backend"?

From the Microsoft Style Guide: back end, back-end Don't use if you can substitute a more specific term, such as server, operating system, database, or network. Two words as a noun. ...
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8 votes

Is it correct to use a hyphen in 'arbitrary-typed data'?

"Typed" here is an adjective. As I think your intent is that "arbitrary" is modifying "typed" and not "data", that is, the data is not arbitrary, but rather the typing of the data is arbitrary, you ...
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  • 56.8k
7 votes
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Is "forty-five year-old" correct?

According to the Chicago Manual of Style you are right and it should be "Forty-five-year-old [man]". Quoting from the Chicago Manual of Style (14th edition, page 223): two-year-old car sixty-five-...
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  • 5,221
7 votes
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What are constructions like "the getting-to-know-you stuff" called?

In the "getting-to-know-you stuff", the hyphenated part is a 'modifying phrase'. It basically fulfills the role of an adjective. Outwardly it reminds a 'compound adjective', but does not have the ...
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  • 36.1k
7 votes

Left handside, left hand side, left hand-side?

It's "left-hand side", the side nearest the left hand. "Left hand" forms a compound adjective and so should be hyphenated.
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6 votes

A sentence may contain two nouns back-to-back. How are these nouns written?

The general rule for noun phrases like this is to separate them by spaces. However, many* specific pairs of words have exceptions and are either written hyphenated, or are even merged into a new word ...
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  • 9,399
6 votes
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correct use of hyphens to connect two words

Two words are joined by a hyphen when the collocation occurs in a non-standard context. For instance, we speak of the front end (space, no hyphen) of a car when this acts a noun phrase: The front ...
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6 votes

The use of the word *size* here

A Samsung-sized marketing budget Since Samsung is a multinational corporate giant, I would expect this to refer to a very large budget. airport-sized publicity stunts An airport is a very large ...
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  • 31k
6 votes
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Two-year program or Two-years program?

When we use counted elements as adjectives, they take a hyphen and lose the plural ending -s, because adjectives don't have plural forms in English: Here are some examples: a two-year program, a 3-...
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  • 655
6 votes

What is the difference between in depth and in-depth?

"In-depth" is an adjective which means comprehensive and precise, while "in depth" is a phrase or idiom which works like an adverb, meaning the same, so as comprehensively and precisely. Examples: An ...
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6 votes
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Are noun+noun and noun's (aphostrope) + noun the same?

Both three weeks' holiday and a three-week holiday are possible. The hyphenated form acts like an adjective. "I live ten minutes' walk from the station" does not need a hyphen. However, ...
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  • 29.6k
5 votes

correct use of hyphens to connect two words

Hyphens are used in English in a number of distinct ways. Here are a few: They are used to form compound nouns. For example "the be-all and end-all" or "back-formation". Most often compound nouns ...
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5 votes
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Should I use a hyphen in this sentence?

Absolutely not. What we are looking at here, is a simple pair of adjective + noun. Grammatically speaking the same pattern as: green shoes dusty attic last winter ... Therefore: No, ...
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  • 14.2k
5 votes
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"End user" vs. "end-user" — correct usage of hyphen

Even native speakers might be confused which to use, so the answer is really "both can be correct". "End user" is such a relatively recent term that there is no "standard" way to write it. However ...
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  • 87k
5 votes
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Hyphenation of adjectives composed of three words

The question begins: Hyphenating an adjective composed of two words is, from what I understand, fairly straightforward: if the adjective is before the noun, it must be hyphenated ... But this ...
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  • 31.6k

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