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33

Ah, I presume you mean you looked up thank-you, which is an existing noun but not the same thing at all as the common idiom thank you. Merriam-Webster tells us: Full Definition of THANK-YOU : a polite expression of one's gratitude Origin of THANK-YOU from the phrase thank you used in expressing gratitude First Known Use: 1792 Now, the phrase “thank you” ...


26

I don't think you're going to be corrected or admonished for using any of these three. Google understands you perfectly no matter how you type it. Wikipedia features all three as well. Personally, I'd write it as 'backend' or 'back end' as I'm not a fan of over-hyphenating (excuse my hypocrisy) unnecessarily. (NGram removed) The NGram essentially supports ...


25

You should not use hyphens in these instances. We do not hyphenate such noun phrases when they are used in ordinary nominal contexts such as object of a preposition or argument (subject, object, complement) of a verb: He has been a realtor for thirteen years. Thirteen years have passed since he entered the real estate business. He has spent thirteen ...


22

You have four examples due to how the words are being used differently in each case. The noun phrase “brute force” describes the raw strength used to achieve or get through something. For example: "Greg used brute force to open the stuck door." Below is an explanation of the different formats you found. I have also linked to an article about hyphens and ...


21

Yes, the hyphen should follow 10. In addition, a space should follow this hyphen, indicating that 10- is attached to year-..., not to to: ...the time spent by 10- to 15-year-olds on two activities Note that spent, the past participle of spend, is employed as an attributive.


21

Quick answer for general use: hyphenation is for adjectives, not adverbs: They sheltered in place. [no hyphen] The dancers twirl in place. [no hyphen] The in-place sheltering command was given at dawn. [adjective] The boilers were replaced on site. On-site replacement of boilers is offered by the company. [adjective]


17

You can Spell it as back end when used as a noun, as for example "I am working on the back end of a project", and Spell it as back-end when used as an adjective, as for example "The back-end technologies for this project will be Apache, MySQL and PHP." Hyphenating compound adjectives is common in English, and both the links above use the hyphenated form ...


16

This is not a question of grammar, but of style. Writers use hyphens with compound adjectives to avoid ambiguity so that the reader does not have to read and re-read a sentence to garner the meaning from it. Consider: John was a white bearded man. Someone might try to parse this sentence at first to mean he was a white man who had a beard. John was ...


14

No. Firstly: neither phrase needs a hyphen. The use of hyphens can be tricky, but here the relevant rule is that they are used to make compound modifiers. Use a hyphen to link a modifier to another word, when the two together then modify something else. He is well liked. ("Well" modifies "like".) He is a well-liked person. ("Well" modifies "like", ...


11

Per the Online Etymology Dictionary, tonight was written as two words until the 18th century, after which it was written with a hyphen until the early 20th century. It's a similar story for today, except it acquired a hyphen about two centuries earlier. In other words, when Jane Eyre was written, "to-night" and "to-day" were the correct way to spell these ...


11

Robusto's answer is correct, I'm just adding another thought. You asked: Is this a case of people making a grammatical mistake or are both forms completely correct and it's just a matter of preference? Robusto didn't quite address that question head on. While there is a lot of flexibility in punctuation, I would say any professional editor worth his or ...


10

Thank you contains a verb(thank) linked to an object(you). This is how we normally thank people. For ex: "[I/we] thank you for being here." Like many other phrases, this commonly used phrase was turned into a single hyphenated word, 'thank-you'. It is considered as the noun/adjective form of 'thank you'. For ex: I sent him a thank-you card. He ...


9

To-day and to-night aren't the only words to have evolved like this. I'm aware that Ngrams can be over-used, but, in this case, I think the way these Ngrams trace the words’ evolution is rather instructive: Incidentally, the same thing happened with to-morrow as happened with to-day and to-night. This Reuters article might make one think that the demise of ...


9

Your examples aren't exactly the same. In your first example, you're actually missing a comma: I heard his deep, warm voice filling the room. You need the comma here because both deep and warm describe voice. What kind of voice is it? A voice that is deep and warm. She was wearing a deep crimson shirt. No comma here, and also no hyphen; deep describes ...


9

I think the word you're looking for is long-term. We refer to long-term benefits or long-term goals. Long run would make more sense like this: I know it seems difficult now, but these changes will make things better in the long run. Long-term is hyphenated because it's a compound adjective. The long run is not; I'm pretty sure it's a noun phrase.


9

Yes, you've got it right. JKR didn't want to duplicate the word "black", so it is implied to be the word before the hyphen (because it is the word before the preceding hyphen, in black-haired.) The term for this is suspended hyphens. This seems a ridiculously short answer, but I'm not sure what else there is to say to answer your question.


9

The former is how we divide parking into syllables in speech (following the Maximum Onset Principle): /ˈpɑr·kɪŋ/ The latter is how we divide parking when we need to break it across lines in writing. We identify the suffix -ing and separate it from the previous morpheme, ignoring pronunciation: park·ing However, there is an exception to this rule. ...


8

According to the Chicago Manual of Style you are right and it should be "Forty-five-year-old [man]". Quoting from the Chicago Manual of Style (14th edition, page 223): two-year-old car sixty-five-year-old man two-and-a-half-year-old child six-year-old girls six year-old girls man sixty-five years old child two and a half years old twenty-...


8

"Typed" here is an adjective. As I think your intent is that "arbitrary" is modifying "typed" and not "data", that is, the data is not arbitrary, but rather the typing of the data is arbitrary, you need an adverb. So you should say "arbitrarily typed data". No hyphen is needed. You don't use a hyphen when using a conventional adverb-adjective-noun sequence....


8

In the "getting-to-know-you stuff", the hyphenated part is a 'modifying phrase'. It basically fulfills the role of an adjective. Outwardly it reminds a 'compound adjective', but does not have the typical characteristics of an adjective. The key thing that makes it work like an adjective here is that it is in the attributive position relative to the noun "...


7

Two words are joined by a hyphen when the collocation occurs in a non-standard context. For instance, we speak of the front end (space, no hyphen) of a car when this acts a noun phrase: The front end of my Chrysler was dented. My Chrysler was hit on the front end. But when we use front end as an attributive, we hyphenate it: My Chrysler suffered a ...


7

The general rule for noun phrases like this is to separate them by spaces. However, many* specific pairs of words have exceptions and are either written hyphenated, or are even merged into a new word with no separation at all. For example, "copy editor" is in the process of moving from unhyphenated noun phrase through hyphenated noun phrase to new word, ...


6

This is fairly common in what you might call 'low-formal' registers - the language of techno- and bureaucrats. I myself find it unexceptionable when the leading elements are normally separated from the trailing element by hyphens; this is really no different from an ordinary conjunct modifier, where the separation is by space rather than hyphen. pre- ...


6

According to most style guides, yes, you need hyphens in compound adjectives. (Note that this only applies to adjectives that come before the word they modify: in she was old fashioned, it is not necessary, because it comes after; in an old-fashioned woman, it is.) The general rule is to use hyphens only where they are necessary to prevent ambiguity or ...


6

A Samsung-sized marketing budget Since Samsung is a multinational corporate giant, I would expect this to refer to a very large budget. airport-sized publicity stunts An airport is a very large facility. So I would expect this phrase to mean roughly: A very large budget buys you a giant/huge marketing campaign (which would include big publicity ...


6

When we use counted elements as adjectives, they take a hyphen and lose the plural ending -s, because adjectives don't have plural forms in English: Here are some examples: a two-year program, a 3-day hike, a two-hour test, a four-year-old child, a 100-year war


6

"In-depth" is an adjective which means comprehensive and precise, while "in depth" is a phrase or idiom which works like an adverb, meaning the same, so as comprehensively and precisely. Examples: An in-depth analysis of the problem. The problem was analysed in depth.


6

Both versions are used. If we take Google Books as a usage indication, you can see that the non-hyphenated version is by far the more common one. Note that, unlike "coffee shop", coffeehouse , is more commonly written as one word.


5

Absolutely not. What we are looking at here, is a simple pair of adjective + noun. Grammatically speaking the same pattern as: green shoes dusty attic last winter ... Therefore: No, there is no hyphen. Your phrase remains as: "Temperature is low" is the first rule's premise.


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