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0

1a) These are a bird's feathers. 1b) This a complex one because there is a noun "birdcage" that means a cage for one or more birds. But you can say "this is a bird's cage" without necessarily implying that it cannot hold more than one bird. 2) Actually the more common phrasing would be "This is the bird's cage." The prepositional phrase indicating ...


1

As Dan said, you call the object a pig trough, so the first example would point out that the trough belongs to a pig. The second example would point out that it belonged to several pigs. "women's wallets", however, is like children's books or men's pants, and specify that the wallets you refer to are for women.


-1

It is not correct. “In the case of” sounds awkward. @HotLicks is right. I always carried an extra mask on my belt, in case mine broke.


0

"Students' Performances" means the performances of several different students. "Student Performances" mean multiple performances done as student exercises. The second could mean multiple performances by a single student. It could also mean performances by people who are in the role of a student, but are not actually students, because here "student" is an ...


-1

"Our today's meeting" means literally "(the) meeting of our today". This is why it's wrong. I believe we all agree that nobody would say "meeting of our today".


1

This sounds like one of those rules that someone made up because they could think of examples where breaking it caused problems, but didn't try to think through if breaking it would ALWAYS cause problems. Well, off the top let me point out that the rule as worded, "never use two possessives in a row", is clearly wrong. People do that all the time and it ...


4

There is no such rule: "our last week's meeting" is perfectly grammatical. There could be a last week's meeting that is not our: "the other team's last week's meeting raised the issue that we covering in our this week's meeting". The phrase "in our last week's episode" is often heard in broadcasting, from native speakers of English. The issue is that ...


6

You can use two possessives in a row, that is not an issue. For example, if I have a cat, and my cat has a toy, I can say "my cat's toy." If there is a manufacturer for that toy, it would be somewhat acceptable, although convoluted, to say "my cat's toy's manufacturer," which would be three possessives in a row. If that manufacturer had subsidiaries, it ...


23

There isn't a rule that you can't use two possessives, but they don't indicate possession of the noun at the end, but instead each one modifies the next phrase. Our last week's meeting Is naturally read as (Our last week)'s meeting So, unless you are talking about meeting someone with in the week before you both die, it is unlikely to mean what you ...


17

Our last week's meeting is a little akward, but I for one do not think that it is incorrect. The answer by Tanner Swett says "it's never acceptable for a noun phrase to have more than one determiner." However, the Wikipedia article lists eight different "common" cases where multiple determiners are acceptable. Specifically: A definite determiner ...


38

I've answered essentially the same question over at english.stackexchange.com: Why is “our today's meeting” wrong? Usually, a noun phrase in English must have exactly one determiner: you can say "I drove this car" or "I drove my car", but not "I drove car" or "I drove this my car". Certain nouns (such as plural nouns and proper nouns) don't need ...


6

It's either: Last week's meeting or: Our meeting last week but I agree with your teacher that: Our last week's meeting sounds awkward and should probably be avoided.


1

If you were taught that "we never use 's to indicate the possession of an inanimate object", then note that this is a "rule" that is not followed in practice, even in formal English. The topic has been discussed at length in this post in English Language and Usage. As noted in the accepted answer, the possessive 's appears even in the English translated ...


2

First, since you are referring to "makers" as a plural, I would avoid "Maker's Night" (singular possessive) at all costs. A common example would be "Ladies' Night" or "Ladies Night," which is also seen written both ways. In that case, though, the ladies are the customers, whereas your makers are the stallholders. Similarly, "Children's Day" or "Seniors' ...


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