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2 votes

How to name a text with a line in the middle: strike-through, struck-through, struck-out, crossed-out, crossed-off or maybe something else?

Yes, those are all reasonable, I wouldn't use (1) because it's the wrong tense. And I might well prefer "A word/phrase that has been crossed out/struck through", as it isn't a type of text.
0 votes

"Have the chance of" or "have a chance of"

OP's two sentences are: 1.Once you have a chance of reviewing the document, let me know what you think. 2.Once you have the chance of reviewing the document, let me know what you think. Both are ...
James Mathai's user avatar
  • 1,128
0 votes

using ignorant as a positive word

You could use "ignorant" to imply innocence, particularly of something negative. Sally arrived from her hometown ignorant of the wicked ways of the Big City but she was a quick study.
Spehro Pefhany's user avatar
1 vote

would last x could last

... there was no chance we would last. ... there was no chance we could last. We omit the second that in example 2 to simplify comparison. Edit The examples have slightly different meanings. The ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
3 votes

using ignorant as a positive word

No, it won't work, partly for the reason you give, but also because it means unaware of some information - it doesn't get used of a capability or incapability.
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 76.3k
0 votes

what is the difference between "ship", "deliver" and "send", e.g. "we will ship/deliver/send the item to your house"?

To "ship a package to someone" means "to make arrangements with a carrier to transport the item from the shipper's location to someone's location." The precise nature of the ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
0 votes

what is the difference between "ship", "deliver" and "send", e.g. "we will ship/deliver/send the item to your house"?

My Shopee page has just these two: 'To Ship' and 'To Receive' without further breakdown into the different legs. There’re also no mentions on the types of vehicles. So it’s fine to say we will send ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

The right word for ___

Wetland or wetlands Simply stated, wetlands are parts of our landscape that are defined by the presence of water. More specifically, wetlands are areas where the presence of water determines or ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.9k
1 vote

The right word for ___

Rivers and other bodies of water like ponds have banks. It's just about the most generic word you could use. Typical everyday BrE usage: The banks of the River Thames The bonnie banks of Loch Lomond ...
Peter Jennings's user avatar
1 vote

Substitute for "has turned into"

clears his throat Gentlemen, Bulk-reply to Seowjooheng's reply "We could consider 'become'" and to Daemon's reply "Change 'become' to 'became'", and to Seowjooheng's reply "'...
Kuromaku's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Substitute for "has turned into"

Has fallen into Has sunk into Has plunged into Has spiralled into Has slipped into Has declined into Has deteriorated into Has devolved into Has slumped into Has collapsed into Has tumbled into Has ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
1 vote

Substitute for "has turned into"

One option is deteriorated: become progressively worse. "relations between the countries had deteriorated sharply" Another option is decayed: having fallen into disrepair; deteriorated. &...
Daemons's user avatar
  • 113
3 votes

Substitute for "has turned into"

Such a construction excludes many possibilities as it needs a linking verb. We could consider became: It's sad to see how a neighborhood that was once so beautiful and well-kept [became] a decrepit ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Individuals vs People. Is it correct to use "individuals" to refer to people of a particular type in a positive light?

They're basically interchangeable, but the use of "individuals" gives emphasis to the people's individual nature. You'd probably refer to a "crowd of people" rather than a "...
Nuclear Hoagie's user avatar
0 votes

What word would you call something sticking out from a surface? (see photos inside)

A handhold in mountaineering What word would you call something sticking out as in the pictures below? Projection is a common word that can be used for all the photographs. Other words are bulge, ...
James Mathai's user avatar
  • 1,128
0 votes

What word would you call something sticking out from a surface? (see photos inside)

(2) is a beam; (3) and (4) are columns. These are building structures integrated into the ceiling slab and the walls. Edit We could call them protrusions. Applying this to (2) to (4), we could say ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

Differences between Solely vs Only as Adverbs

Difference between solely and only. "Only" can function as either an adjective or an adverb. "Solely" can only be an adverb. (sole = adjective) Dictionary meaning "only" ...
James Mathai's user avatar
  • 1,128
1 vote
Accepted

Differences between Solely vs Only as Adverbs

only offers more flexible positioning in some respects and more limited positioning in others where ambiguity is to be avoided. He alone became responsible for the firm, i.e. he acquired exclusive ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
0 votes

I’ve already called her four times ________. Why not before?

I've already called her four times today. No issues there. I've already called her four times yesterday. yesterday confines the action to the past so simple past is the better choice and the ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
0 votes

In a data report about online shopping, can I use "cybershopping" or "e-shopping" as alternatives?

Totally agree with Jay. While it's important for the IELTS (and other language tests) to vary your vocabulary, thus showing your great vocab level, it's always best to focus on sounding natural. When ...
LLT's user avatar
  • 21
4 votes
Accepted

Do you really distinguish the difference between "the shirt's rumpled" and "the shirt's wrinkled" and "the shirt's creased"?

You forgot crumpled! My take on it: I would call a garment wrinkled if it hadn't been ironed after being washed - full of small creases. I would call it creased if it had been placed between other ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 57.5k
2 votes

Do you really distinguish the difference between "the shirt's rumpled" and "the shirt's wrinkled" and "the shirt's creased"?

First, no, creases aren’t necessarily intentional. To call something creased often conveys that the thing bears a single crease. And creases are sharper, more pronounced than are wrinkles. Also, the ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
0 votes

I'll be going or I will be get going?

Difference - "should be going" and "should get going". OP's query Which form is correct? I'll be going or I will be get going or I will get going? The correct phrases are "...
James Mathai's user avatar
  • 1,128
0 votes

How should I introduce myself after I moved in to a new place I rented

Self - introduction. OP's question is regarding self introduction. Because I rented this place, should I say something like. "Hi I am a tenant living in xxxx and I just moved in". or. "...
James Mathai's user avatar
  • 1,128
0 votes

Degree or extent of something

So as an adverb:. OP's enquired about 'si' used as an adverb. Ref. Cambridge dictionary so + adjective (so difficult), so + adverb (so slowly). We often use so when we mean ‘to such a great extent’. ...
James Mathai's user avatar
  • 1,128
2 votes

Why is it ‘lived’ instead of ‘live’ in: "I'm surprised I lived”?

I'm surprised I lived. The surprise suggests there was a threat to life, but that the speaker did not die. Thus, "I lived" has the meaning "I survived" not "I am alive now&...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
1 vote
Accepted

Is it correct to say "don't eat walking around" or "don't walk around eating"?

Clarity This is clearer: Don't walk around while you are eating. This is even clearer: Sit down and stay in one place while you are eating. It's usually clearer to ask for what you want than to ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 27.6k
1 vote

Is it correct to say "don't eat walking around" or "don't walk around eating"?

Without while connecting your two clauses, your sentences sound like the following, where the two actions are integral to each other, not simply being done at the same time. The potential buyer ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
1 vote
Accepted

Is it correct to say "the baby can walk 4 steps today" or "the baby can take 4 steps today"?

When reporting the ambulatory progress of a toddler it is idiomatic to say The baby took her first steps today. The baby took four steps today. The baby walked across the room today. "walked ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
3 votes

can we say "the fan turned off by itself"?

We find lots of entries when we Google turned off by itself. This usage is hence quite common. This is true too when it comes to books. Google Books has lots of hits for turned off by itself. For ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

School of thought VS Notion

Yes, the "number of ideas" matters, but so does the number of people. You've found a situation in which either could work, but we could imagine some that could use only one. If I write an ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.7k
-1 votes

School of thought VS Notion

It can be either one depending on what you want to say. It depends on how you define it based on those dictionary definitions. Howver, "train of thought" does not work as a train of thought ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.9k
0 votes

School of thought VS Notion

In this case, notion is the better choice because You are arguing against the idea, therefore you want to cast doubt on this assertion. It is easier to challenge a single person's experience than a ...
DelphicOracle's user avatar
0 votes

School of thought VS Notion

A (metaphoric) school of thought is a lot more substantial than a notion, because it implies many other (by implication, educated) people having the same idea(s). To have a "notion" about ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Is "conversational" used correctly in this context?

The person who wrote the text doesn't have great command of English. It's pretty obvious to me that what he was trying to convey was... ...[you should] do some research to at least become conversant ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote

What is the difference between "the worst" and "the most extreme"?

I think it is incorrect to say "the worst suffering" would likely generate a negative response but "the most extreme suffering" would not. Both phrases mean pretty much the same ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 68k
1 vote

What is the difference between "the worst" and "the most extreme"?

Sometimes "worst" is the wrong word because it's subjective. Climate scientists talk about "extreme temperatures" not "worst temperatures" because they want an objective ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
3 votes

What is the difference between "the worst" and "the most extreme"?

I think your statement about the difference responses to the phrases is simply wrong. "Being made a clotheshorse by my parents is the worst suffering I ever experienced" and "Being made ...
timchessish's user avatar
  • 2,194
0 votes

What is the movement called when you put out a cigarette on the ground with your foot?

Extinguishing a cigarette with your foot expression. OP can convey his meaning by adding under the foot for the words in website link below For example stubbed out/ stubbed/ snuffed out/ under his ...
James Mathai's user avatar
  • 1,128
-1 votes

another vs remaining

Community halls and other locations, along with college-based studios, account for another/the remaining 18% and 10%, respectively. We should use another as remaining is used only if there’s just one ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

another vs remaining

The remaining is the correct choice here. Another means "an additional item from a list". The remaining means "every other item from the list, considered as a group." He's ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar

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