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3 votes
Accepted

When does the end of the trip happen if we say "they had a trip to a candy factory"?

The phrases "beginning of a trip" and "end of a trip" are not rigidly defined in English. You have to look at the context and apply common sense. "Beginning of a trip" ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.7k
1 vote

How to express a candle in a burning state?

The candle is burning The candle is lit Both are fine and essentially mean the same thing, but 'burning' perhaps emphasises the candle being used up - a candle "burns down" and then goes ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 102k
1 vote

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

It seems to be BrE-specific, but the first word that came to mind for me was "tyke". From Cambridge dictionary: a child who behaves badly in a way that is funny rather than serious
Especially Lime's user avatar
-1 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

I find that English, unfortunately, does not have a great number of words to suit this particular purpose. Most of them can have very negative connotations, especially if heard by others who do not ...
End Anti-Semitic Hate's user avatar
1 vote

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

A pretty non offensive, endearing way to refer to a misbehaving child is to replace their name with 'Trouble'. You can also use it when they are not misbehaving at the moment but often tend to. I once ...
Judith Jones's user avatar
1 vote

How to express a candle in a burning state?

You could also describe the candle's state by saying that it is alight — which means that it's: burning, lit, on fire. and/or that it's: shining with light; luminous, radiant
gidds's user avatar
  • 1,065
0 votes

What is the verbal phrase for "making a candle stop burning"?

What is the verbal phrase for "making a candle stop burning"? The following are all valid, and roughly in order of how often they are used: 1. Blow out "You can blow out the candles ...
fatalerrer's user avatar
1 vote

What is the verbal phrase for "making a candle stop burning"?

A century ago you'd have been far more likely to snuff the candle, rather than blow it out... But as you can see from this chart, although snuff has declined considerably, you should double the ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
3 votes

How to express a candle in a burning state?

Lighted candle is more idiomatic than lit candle. (See this Ngram). (In response to comments) Well, it feels much more idiomatic to me (70+). According to one of the results, Ebenezer Brewer in 1882 ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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2 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

I used to read and hear imp, it sounds almost cute but perhaps it's not so common nowadays. She's [a bit of] an imp This tells the listener that the small child sometimes misbehaves. I believe ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.1k
15 votes

How to express a candle in a burning state?

Yes, a lit candle or the candle is lit. "Lit" is one of these participles that has become, or is becoming, an adjective. But "burning" is also used: Keep lit candles away from ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
6 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

Out of those rascal is common enough to be understood (if still a little old-fashioned) and the most likely to be affectionate out of context. Most of those words are usually used to refer to adults ...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
12 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

This is enormously family dependent, and rapidly changing. Words like "scamp" or "rapscallion" or "scalliwag" now seem rather dated. "Cheeky monkey" seemed ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
2 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

Some possibilities would be "scamp" or "terror". Note, phrases like this would usually be used as an exclamation, rather than as full sentences: You little scamp! You terror!
Daniel Roseman's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Is "I am all against it" a counterpart of "I am all for it"?

Yes, we can say to be against something , but I'm all for it is a common idiom and this Ngram shows that I'm all against it is very much less common.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 54.8k
2 votes

the length of time vs the duration

The most natural phrasing for the context is #4... Thirty-two hours was how long General Motors... ...spent on average manufacturing... (valid, but imho "clunky") ...took on average to ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote

A pervasive, consistent, .... root-soil net?

(Full disclosure: I am not in any way trained or educated in any agricultural or geological disciplines; however, I am a native English speaker born and raised by hobby-gardening parents in a small ...
DotCounter's user avatar
  • 1,020
0 votes

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

I'm actually going to argue that "my car is high on fuel" is a perfectly acceptable thing to say. It's unusual to be sure ("good on fuel" would likely be more typical) and, as ...
Matthew's user avatar
  • 221
11 votes

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

As you know, the phrase "we're low on fuel" essentially means "the amount of fuel we have is less than we would like it to be" or "it would be better if we had more fuel."...
Tanner Swett's user avatar
  • 5,932
3 votes

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

“Low on fuel” is a fixed expression that cannot be easily modified. “I’m high on fuel” means I’m a drug addict who was been sniffing fuel to get high. Don’t do this. “My car is full of fuel” means I’m ...
gnasher729's user avatar
  • 3,871
1 vote

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

While this is only slightly different than one of the other answers, I think "I've got a full tank" is the most-used phrase, at least as far as I've heard. If you wanted to specifically ...
Tim Hardy's user avatar
  • 111
7 votes

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

If you want to use a similar phrasing, you could say you are "good on fuel"- this doesn't mean necessarily that you have a lot, but that you have enough. Good - adjective h (informal) : ...
Edward's user avatar
  • 171
45 votes
Accepted

Do you say "my car is high on fuel" as a counterpart of "my car is low on fuel"?

No, "high on fuel" is not an idiomatic opposite for "low on fuel". An idiomatic opposite would be, "my tank is nearly full." While high can be the opposite of low, it's ...
Juhasz's user avatar
  • 9,794
0 votes

How to refer to the last of more than two elements in a list without reiterating the names?

"Latter" would be used when discussing two elements on the list. I would use last instead of latter here.
Nishant's user avatar
0 votes

How to refer to the last of more than two elements in a list without reiterating the names?

You can spell it out, direct our attention to the latter two. Another form would be direct our attention to the last two
Mary's user avatar
  • 5,145
-1 votes

How to refer to the last of more than two elements in a list without reiterating the names?

would "latter" be correct? No. It is "last". late (adj. - not used in this sense) - latter (comparative - usually, but not exclusively, of two) -> last (superlative). The ...
user81561's user avatar
  • 2,462
0 votes

Medical instead of medicine in a chart

This is not a genuine test resource from IELTS. Yes, the graph is badly labelled. For example "Education training" - that probably means "working in education or in training" ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
1 vote

Traffic is too loud to hear you

As others have said, both are natural phrases you would expect to hear from a native English speaker, but they have slightly different meanings because the subject/emphasis is a little different. ...
Kel's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote

How can I remember the difference between "loose" and "lose"?

Don't let the Moose loose, or you lose your shoes. (Moose rhymes with loose, and lose rhymes with shoes. Hope this helps.)
DMANGANERD's user avatar
1 vote

Traffic is too loud to hear you

The sentence is fine in informal English. It omits naming the subject doing the hearing. From a formal viewpoint, the grammar allows for the interpretation, "the traffic is too loud for the ...
Kaz's user avatar
  • 6,556
1 vote

Traffic is too loud to hear you

Many good answers already. To summarize the key points for you: Sentence 1 is perfectly comprehensible to native English speakers sounds more natural in spoken conversation (shorter in a noisy ...
William Boyer's user avatar
2 votes

Traffic is too loud to hear you

Your first sentence is perfectly normal vernacular English. It isn't strictly 'correct', and some people would be slightly bothered by that - I would use the second sentence in, for example, a job ...
aantia's user avatar
  • 311
0 votes

Traffic is too loud to hear you

In constructions that use "too [x] to [y]" the usual inference is that the subject has an attribute (x) that is preventing it from doing something (y) or having it being done to it. For ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 102k
0 votes

Is there any noteworthy difference between "expend" and "spend"?

"Expend" is used in budgetary context, "spend" is consume More specifically, you'd use "expend" when the you wanna draw attention to the resource. "Spend" is ...
Raestloz's user avatar
  • 287
9 votes

Traffic is too loud to hear you

English allows such infinitival clauses that seem to be missing a subject: It's too cold to go swimming. It's too cold to swim. The water is too cold to go swimming. It's too smoky to see clearly. It'...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
30 votes

Traffic is too loud to hear you

Sometimes, often, we interpret sentences based on assumptions about the real world. If I said, "Mary is too loud to hear you", it would be unclear whether I mean that I cannot hear you or ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.7k
0 votes

This is our first /the first test this term

If you want to indicate possession, "the" is replaced by "our" in this sentence. This is the first test this term. This is our first test this term. This is my first test this ...
evan's user avatar
  • 41
0 votes

This is our first /the first test this term

*This is our the first test this term. From Collins Dictionary, Most noun phrases contain only one determiner or none at all, but if there are more, they follow a definite order. There are two ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes

Which kinds of places can I use "people, inhabitants, dwellers, citizens, residents" to describe people living there?

city residents : people who are officially considered to have a permanent address in a particular city Only city residents may apply for a library card. That is, only people with a permanent ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
2 votes

Which kinds of places can I use "people, inhabitants, dwellers, citizens, residents" to describe people living there?

Typically "citizens" relates to legal rights, but "residents" refers to the place you live. When I lived abroad, I was a resident of Tokyo and Japan, but not a citizen. It is ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
3 votes

Which kinds of places can I use "people, inhabitants, dwellers, citizens, residents" to describe people living there?

The number of Manchester people/residents/dwellers/citizens/inhabitants is increasing. The number of city residents/dwellers/inhabitants is increasing. The number of apartment residents/dwellers/...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

Is there any noteworthy difference between "expend" and "spend"?

I'd say that the ex prefix can draw attention to outflow and the fact that what is being spent is not limitless. Not that the word is being used in that way in the Turkey example. Like Grammarly, I ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
0 votes

Is there any noteworthy difference between "expend" and "spend"?

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, expend is a formal word. That means it's fine to use it in formal writing (and I would say that the sentence you quoted is formal writing), but you wouldn't use ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.7k
1 vote

Cut off and cutoff/cut-off

You're right that "cutoff" is a closed compound noun. "Cut off" can be used as a verb phrase; however, Cambridge Dictionary notes that 'cut-off' (hyphenated) is an acceptable form ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 102k
1 vote

The USA's spending on or in this category

For statistics and numbers (in economics/business): U.S. spending on something, which as seen below are three different categories of spending. Total nominal spending on medicines in the U.S. from ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 44.8k
0 votes

The USA's spending on or in this category

We normally spend money on something. The company spent a lot of money in Q1 on transportation. But once you begin to abstract the real world situation into charts and graphs and spreadsheets with ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
2 votes

The USA's spending on or in this category

The two phrases spending on and spending in are used for different purposes. For services like health or infrastructure, or similar, we say spending on. For countries or years, we say spending in. ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes
Accepted

Push VS. Press; what's the difference?

Collins Dictionary in its B1 definition for press says VERB B1 If you press something somewhere, you push it firmly against something else [emphasis added]. To do that, the effort generally needs to ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Why do they use 'persons' rather than 'people' here?

The use of persons is possible in very formal context: Persons (plural) is a very formal word. We only use it in rather legalistic contexts: [notice in a lift] Any person or persons found in ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

Difference between first condition clauses

Yes If the situation happens, you can do that, but that's just one of the many possibilities in mind, and depending on how you say it, may even be the undesired choice you mention just for the sake ...
Raestloz's user avatar
  • 287

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