New answers tagged

0

Yes, the configuration of the balloon's material that prevents the air from escaping from the balloon does count as a knot.


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Both are correct. As with all collective nouns, it depends on whether you consider the family as a single unit (taking has) or a number of individuals (taking have). This will often depend on the context. So it may feel more natural to say: The family have gathered in the living room to discuss their future. when you consider them as individual ...


2

The verbs are open and close. I open a door, then I close the door. Doors open and close. The past participles are opened and closed. The adjectives are open and closed. The door is open or is closed. (Note that "close" can also be an adjective, but with a different meaning, namely the opposite of far. "The door is close" means the door is nearby, not far ...


1

I would say: The task will be completed in a few weeks


2

Using hyphens in compound adjectives, e.g. a two-seater aircraft, a high-school student, a heavy-metal detector, is considered compulsory in British English, but US English is more lenient, and hyphenation is optional except where ambiguity would arise without a hyphen, or where it is desired to help the reader. If you're unsure, use a hyphen. Hyphens in ...


2

All of those phrases have roughly the same potential meaning when referring to pancakes. However we really only use two phrases in this context. flip a pancake turn a pancake 'Turn the pancake over' is also used, but the word 'over' is redundant and is quite often left out. There is no ambiguity without it so it's not necessary. With other objects ...


1

"Flip the pancake" is far and away the most common.


0

As Orbital Aussie noted, the speaker is using 'baby speak' to make it easier. The correct term is: triangular hole Similarly, you have quoted a difference between British and North American English, whereas my experience of both places is that use of the term 'right-angled triangle' would be used when speaking formally and / or to adults, whereas you ...


0

I think I would say "please fill the kettle", or "I've filled the kettle" and leave it to conversational implicature to imply that it is, or is to be, turned on.


0

"Start" is a commonly used verb, and can imply the performance of all steps necessary to do something. If you ask someone to "start the meeting" that can mean everything from opening up a room to turning on equipment to making opening remarks. "Start the kettle" or "Start the tea" would be a request for everything (water, kettle, electricity, tea) except ...


-1

A link with the synonyms concerning your question. https://www.thespruce.com/how-to-remove-chalk-stains-1900963


0

To dust and to pat come to my mind, as chalk on clothes resemble dust.


1

In American West Coast talk, I would ask my friend to “get some going”, e.g “Hey Ahmad, could you get some tea going?” Or “Hey, Alice, could you get some hot water going?”


1

I'm surprised nobody's used this one, it's the first thing that came to mind. It is a little bit of a variation though: Please brew some tea/[hot] water [in the kettle]. ("hot" and "in the kettle" might be optional here.) My second choice would be: Please make some tea/hot water [in the kettle]. These sound most natural to me.


0

They are all correct and they all mean the same, though 'afterward' is a rarely-seen version of the usual 'afterwards'. Perhaps you meant 'afterwards'. [I'm sure you meant 'started', not 'starded'.] I think 'later' is the most common and 'afterwards' slightly less common. You don't need that second comma in either of these two sentences. 'After' is ...


2

Depending on one's heritage, one might also say "put the billy on" which is grammatically identical to kettle or jug. Probably more common for those who spent time camping, or maybe working in the fields where your hot water literally came from a billy-can over an open fire. This is an AU/NZ concept, but should be understood by a Briton or Irish, according ...


1

Stick on the kettle is often used in British English


1

"Jeeves! Ready the tea!" Yes, it overshoots the original intent, but if you're going to ask for hot water you might as well go all the way and get to the real intended result. But I'd upvote "put the kettle on" if I could.


0

Yes, your use of "on which" is correct here. When one refers to websites, the preposition used most often is "on". Another example to illustrate this is, "The information can be found on our website, which is very well organised". Changing things around a little in order to use "on which", this would become: "Our website, on which the information can be ...


0

I feel that either are acceptable and idiomatic. When referring to content, we do say that things are "on" a website - this has already been answered here. "Where" can refers either to a place or a situation/condition. As you are talking about administrators and policy I'm going to guess that you work in computing - do you know what a WHERE clause is in ...


0

We do not process language by an analysis of grammatical categories. We interpret the present participle "relaxing" as indicating a progressive sense; a process. We interpret the perfect participle "relaxed" as indicating completion, an achieved state. If we choose to interpret participles as adjectives for analytic purposes, they still frequently retain ...


6

In Australia and New Zealand, the phrasing for this is either "put the kettle on" (derived from British usage) or "boil the kettle". Native speakers in both countries also commonly replace 'kettle' in these phrases with 'jug' (prior to electric appliances being universally available, ceramic jugs and metal kettles were both used for boiling water, and many ...


1

While I'm more likely to say "put on the kettle", I might also "run the kettle" in the same way that I would "run the dishwasher" or "run a load of laundry". "While I'm already running the kettle, should I heat up enough water for you also?"


1

The use of kind and car need to match. Singular: Any kind of car Plural All kinds of cars


67

I think most Brits would say, "Put the kettle on", with both the electricity and the water taken for granted. It's what we used to say even before we had electricity, and it was enshrined in the nursery rhyme of circa 1800, "Polly put the kettle on," whose deathless lyrics are: Polly put the kettle on Polly put the kettle on Polly put the kettle on ...


2

Speaking as an American, I have never before heard the term "skate shoe". I've always heard "roller skates", or "skates" for short. Note that "skates" can also be short for "ice skates". The phrase is almost always used in the plural, like "I put on my roller skates" or "I put on a pair of roller skates". I suppose if you lost one of the pair, you might ...


2

You're correct, a fluent speaker would not use "occupy" here. The most natural thing to say would be, "Excuse me, I'm using that." Depending on how forceful or polite you want to be and what rights you have to the kettle versus the other person, it might be, "Hey, that's my kettle! Get your hands off!", or at the opposite end, "Excuse me, I just boiled that ...


20

This may be a regional thing, but speaking as an American: I'd probably say "please put on the kettle". This doesn't make much literal sense -- put what on the kettle? -- but it's a common idiom. Or, "please start the kettle". Or more generally: "please make some tea". Sure, this doesn't specify to use a kettle, but that would likely be assumed. As ...


3

I as an American do not find "boil the kettle" an idiomatic way to say fill the electric kettle with liquid and then apply the appropriate amount of electrical current to the kettle in order to heat the liquid to some unspecified degree I cannot recollect a single verb that expresses the combined actions of filling a container with liquid and then ...


0

First, I'll mention that there's nothing wrong with the adjectives you've started out with: Difficult, unfriendly, argumentative, uncooperative, etc. One word that comes to mind, though it's a little dated, is: contrary opposite in nature, direction, or meaning. perversely inclined to disagree or to do the opposite of what is expected or ...


0

I would simply say: Oh, sorry, that's my water[ - I need it all]. If someone challenges your "ownership" of it, you could then say something like: I [just] boiled it. Or, more forcefully, for emphasis: I'm the one who boiled it. The above is maybe a bit aggressive though - in almost all cases (i.e. in polite society) you'd be fine with just my ...


19

The phrasings that are most idiomatic to me (British) would be: Could/can you put the kettle on, please? Could/can you boil the kettle, please?


0

my search in "google ngram" about your question showed me that all is right with both of these sentences. But for me they have slightly different meaning from each other. When you talk about car from range of them, you can use "Any kind of car" and anyway it will be talking inside category of usual cars (if you don't have any specific context with your ...


9

As a first-language speaker, the first word that comes to mind is "boil". That is, Please boil the kettle. We need some hot water. This is obviously an idiomatic expression. I wouldn't suggest using "set up" since it isn't idiomatic. Another option you could use is Please put on the kettle. Both imply that you are boiling the water within the ...


1

This is a roller skate. The wheels pivot together when the skate is leaned, like a skateboard does. Lean right: the front wheel assembly twists clockwise when viewed from above, the rear counter clockwise, like 4 wheel steering on a car. And then there's the strap on roller skates we had as kids in the 1960s, no practical way to stop except for taking a ...


3

In the US, we (at least those of us of certain age) would call the item in your picture "roller blades" or "inline skates". Traditional roller skates have the wheels positioned like a car (two wheels side-by-side in the front and back).


0

They appear to be Saxon- and Latin-rooted words which are essentially synonymous, with only slight variations in usage: OED says grave is from Old English from Saxon from German from Norse, ultimately from grafan (to dig) with meanings including: a. A place of burial; an excavation in the earth for the reception of a corpse; †formerly often applied ...


1

We normally clean windows, clean the car, clean the floor etc. which means freeing from dirt and dust something that is dirty. So, telling a child to clean their pee, which is a grammatical sentence, is literally asking them to wash their pee. Orbital Aussie's answer is therefore correct but I'd prefer to say “clean up the floor” or “mop that up” (mop up ...


4

Yes, it is wrong to say just “clean” in that context. To give the additional sense of removal you want, you need to use the phrase verb “clean up”. For example: Little Oscar pulled handfuls of soil out of the potted plant onto the floor. I used a dustpan and brush to clean up the soil. [I cleaned the floor, but I cleaned up the soil.]


1

A cup is normally hollow and concave, it is usually used for containing liquid, if we were to compare it to a pool, choosing the most suitable answer in the OP's question should become clear Kim jumped on / onto the pool (NO) Water is not a hard solid surface. Kim jumped on the springboard (YES) A springboard has a solid surface. Kim ran and jumped onto ...


1

There is a subtle difference. This type of economic policy can be harmful for any nation Any emphasizes that nations other than our own are included. You can think of this sentence as having a hidden "not just your nation" or "not just our nation" attached to it. This type of economic policy can be harmful for a nation This is a neutral statement ...


0

She has to swim twice a week. This means that she must swim twice a week, or has some kind of obligation to swim twice a week, or that someone or something is mandating her to swim twice a week (it could be her health, her sports coach, a commitment to a personal goal, etc. - this would be determined by the context). She is to swim twice a week. This is ...


1

It does sound natural. If you are looking for a more strictly correct word for this translation, "identifier" should be your choice. ID is a shorthand for identifier (in this context). This word implies "guaranteed to be unique". A PIN is not guaranteed to be unique despite its apparent meaning, and "RIN" would not be an understood term, so it may not be a ...


1

The natural phrase to use in English would be 'index number' or 'index ref'. You could also use 'catalogue ref' or 'catalogue ID' if it is a large listing.


1

Sure, this happens in English all the time: Americans refer to their car's license plate number or just plate number and these frequently/usually contain letters in addition to digits: just try a Google image search. Britons similarly refer to the car's number plate and it's not purely numeric there either. Serial numbers and model numbers of consumer ...


1

In your example, you probably should us "these", but both are acceptable. For these reasons must be near to the reasons For those reasons must be after the reasons. Good: "I'm poor. I'm sick. For these reasons, I'm not going to the party." "I'm not going to the party for these reasons: I'm poor and I'm sick." "Chapter 1 explained the history. Chapter 2 ...


2

For me, the word that comes to mind is: diligent having or showing care and conscientiousness in one's work or duties. "after diligent searching, he found a parcel"


1

Neither is ideal. Both "warming" and "heating" are used as verbs that operate on an object, for example: John is heating his soup. John is the subject, soup is the object, and it is the soup which is actually getting heated. When you omit an object, it may still be assumed that there is one, for example: Soup is warming. This can mean that soup has ...


0

"At" also can mean "on the surface of", also it does not sound like one could use it in normal conversation. Something like "my image on a door" may be a way to use it : She had TVs everywhere. She saw my image on the kitchen's TV and turned it off screaming. I came right back at her door.


-1

passed / past If you are referring to a distance or a period of time before now, use “past”: “the police car drove past the suspect’s house” (distance) or “the team performed well in the past” (time). If you are describing the action of passing, however, you need to use “passed”: “when John passed the gravy, he spilled it on his lap,” “the teacher was ...


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