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2

No, as written this is not clear. First of al, you should write "The United States is", not "the US are" ever since the US civil war, the country has been regarded as a single nation, not a collection of states, and the singular form is used. In formal or semi-formal writing such as a homework assignment, "US" should pe spelled out as "United States" at ...


0

We use THIS when the co-speaker doesn't have any information about the topic or the thing mentioned. However, use THAT when the speaker and his co-speaker are on the same page as to the thing mentionned.


1

It's all about economics No, "all" is not a pronoun here, but a determinative. The entirety meaning doesn't apply to "about economics" but to "it". "All about economics" is not a PP (preposition phrase), not a single constituent. The "all" is an adjunct and the PP is just "about economics". The meaning can be glossed as "It is entirely about economics". ...


1

Yes "Where do you and I stand?" is correct. However, the use of "me" in forms like "you and me" is sufficiently common that it is doubtful whether it can truly be called 'wrong". It is "non-standard", at least.


0

"Singular they" does have a long history in English, and cannot be considered wrong. It has been more favored in recent decades to avoid "default he", that is, the use of male pronouns for a person of unknown or unspecified gender. That has a much longer history in English than "Singular they" does, but is now considered to show gender bias and is strongly ...


1

The "singular they" prevents the awkwardness of using "he/she" or guessing the gender wrong. For example, I might be talking about you in a chat room, and say: Did you see the latest question posted by Dawny33? She's been asking some interesting questions. However, if you happen to be male, that might create an awkward moment. So, I might say instead, ...


2

This particular it, as noted, is a dummy pronoun -- i.e, it has no reference, it doesn't point to anything. It is in fact inserted by a syntactic rule called Extraposition, which moves "heavy" subjects to the end of the sentence, where they can be processed more easily, and leaves a dummy it behind to satisfy the requirement that all tensed English clauses (...


2

In Spanish, the subjects of sentences are often omitted. The verb conjugations in Spanish are precise enough that the verb usually implies what the subject was. In English, most of the verb conjugations are the same as each other. Within each tense, most verbs only have a distinction between third-person singular and everything else. Here is my advice to ...


0

"Uesd by itself" here means that the pronoun alone, without any other words, functions as the entire noun phrase. He was born in 1960. Here "He" is the grammatical subject, and stands in place of a noun or noun phrase such as "John Smith" or "The man who I met last night". A pronoun can also serve as the grammatical object, or in other grammatical role. ...


1

Both forms are grammatical and have the same structure in terms of parts of speech. Your second ordering ("Whose is this painting?") is antiquated; you should use the first ordering ("Whose painting is this?") in modern speech and writing.


2

You can analyze this problem in terms of the relationship of reference. In both examples, "share" unambiguously refers to "seven percent of the vote. In the second example, "the party's" modifies "share" (which share?), clearly referring, by repetition, to "the party" which is the subject of "win" in the noun clause "the party could win..." which is itself ...


-1

This "it" is often called a "dummy subject". It causes a lot of confusion for people learning English, because "it", when used in this way, doesn't refer specifically to another noun in the paragraph like "it" used in the typical way. You might want to read up on this usage here, or look up "dummy subjects", and you will find many discussions of this special ...


1

Your interpretation is correct. "It" refers to the subject of the previous half of this compound sentence: "the twentieth century". "So" refers to what the author describes as a characteristic of that century ("highly centralized governments", etc.). Side note: It would be confusing if "it" did not refer to the previous subject, because the sentence is ...


1

"get away from it all" is rather an idiom which means "to escape one's everyday life, usually by taking a holiday.". In the sentence, the improvement in modern camping equipment makes it easier/more convenient for people who wish to "escape" to somewhere else.


1

You are correct - the second it refers to "work". The first it is a dummy pronoun - this it does not refer to an agent. The its in the following phrases are dummy pronouns: It may well be that ... It is possible that ... It is probable that ... It is the case that ... It is true that ... It is obvious that ... It is clear ...


3

If you've got totally no idea who that person is, not even the gender, then you could say 'who was it?'. And also, for 'who was it', you can use it when your friend answered a phone call and then he hangs up the phone. Then, you ask him 'who was it?' For situation A, since your friend is telling you about that person, you might ask 'who is he or she' But, ...


1

A) If the pronoun is the subject of a sentence, use he. If the pronoun is the object of a sentence, use him. Your example should be: Who is he. An example where you would use both: I've seen him - who is he? B) If someone called you on the telephone and you do not know them you might ask: Who are you? or Who is this? For some reason I can't ...


0

I would say in this particular example where we're talking about boys, in both cases, each is singular and therefore has/his is correct However, today, in situations where (1) gender is unknown, (2) the group comprise both genders, or (3) there are gender-fluid individuals in the group, it has become more normal to adopt the gender-neutral their (and ...


0

"Each" requires a singular. Therefore the following are correct: Each of the boys has brought his pen. Each boy has brought his pen.


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