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I raised a similar question recently, on subject-verb agreement involving collective nouns. Depending on region, some writers follow more the notional agreement, and some, the grammatical agreement. Both ways are fine, but consistency is key. I have observed that writers sometimes change their mind midway in a paragraph or even in a sentence. This is ...


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That rules text is ambiguous. The key point is, "any" could reasonably mean "zero or more" or "one or more". In other words, normal interpretations of that rule would include: Player discards any number of cards, from 0 to all the cards the player has Player discards any number of cards, from 1 to all the cards the player has ...


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A. "I don't think there's anyone home." Because we do not know how many people are "at home". Someone would be specifically meaning just one person. Anyone, anybody and anything are indefinite pronouns. We use anyone, anybody and anything to refer to both an open, unlimited set of things or people and specific things or people. We use ...


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Something will occur on June 10th. I'll have to survive until that. [that is a pronoun replacing: June 10th]. You do not need to say: until that date or until that time. You can but it is not necessary when speaking. SPOKEN ENGLISH BBC NEWS: "Not true," Cruise's spokesman said about the reports. "I can tell you that he never said that." ...


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"that time" is fine, but there is a more natural word: "then". The word "then" can mean "that time" What time do you come home? / 6 pm / I'll wait until then to do my homework because I want to ask you a question.


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"Does a following pronoun ALWAYS refer to the Subject of the previous sentence?" No. Each pronoun should have a clear and unmistakable noun antecedent, otherwise there will be error of vague pronoun reference. Neither Q1 nor Q2 has a clear single and unmistakable noun antecedent. To correct this, Q1 and Q2 should have their pronouns, 'they', ...


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While on the face of it your friend is the one who is twenty years old, the sentence can be understood the other way. Context would be important. If a heavy banging on the door is heard and somebody asks "Who is that?" then your sentence would not be understood to mean your 20yo friend's toddler son. If clarity is needed without context I would ...


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'It's' is inappropriate; you should use 'He's'. Similarly, 'which' is inappropriate; you should use 'who'. Thus '[He's] a son of my friend [who] is twenty years old.' The relative pronoun 'who' refers to 'my friend'. Modifiers are deemed to modify nouns closest to them. If you want to modify 'son', you can say 'He, who is twenty years old, is a son of my ...


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"Just wait until Mom sees this!" [American English] "Just wait until Mum sees this!" [British English] "Just wait until Mother sees this!" [formal, either English] That means the speaker is addressing someone (a brother or sister) and saying their mother will be angry when she sees whatever the thing or situation is. Mom in ...


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You are correct that "it" refers to "any factual claim". I am also wondering why "that" feels more natural than "those" to this English native, because "those" definitely looks more correct. I believe it is because "that" applies to what is tacitly understood as "the collection of non-...


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