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42 votes

Why use an adjective after a noun?

Rather than Noun + Adjective, it can be thought of as Noun that is Adj, which uses relative clause but that is is omitted. We always have to go to, you know, someplace that is nice. Is there ...
ChocolateOverflow's user avatar
15 votes
Accepted

Why use an adjective after a noun?

There are two possible mechanisms that could explain the position of the adjective in the example sentences that you provided: postpositive adjectives and whiz-deletion. When you apply an adjective ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
5 votes

She's going to tell the truth as she saw/understood it

Does the phrase "as she sees/understands it" modify "tell"? No. It modifies "truth". She is going to tell the truth -- What sort of "truth"? -- the truth as ...
user81561's user avatar
  • 2,627
2 votes

things to make you anxious

Your example (c) makes perfect sense. Of course you can make people anxious by telling them things. Suppose I wanted to make a person anxious, for some reason, e.g. because I felt like being cruel to ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
2 votes

Jeff at the library

The correct answer is b. "Jeff at the library" is a whole phrase referring to a person. Since "at the library" is necessary to clarify which "Jeff" you're talking about, ...
ChocolateOverflow's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

None modifies noun? --" an entryway jumble of backpacks and umbrellas"

"Entryway" here is doing duty as an adjective rather than a noun; the jumble is the noun, and entryway is describing it (in this case, it is a jumble that is positioned in an entryway). As ...
Showsni's user avatar
  • 1,835
2 votes

first child born out of wedlock

Your sentences A and A1 mean exactly the same thing because A is an abbreviated form of A1. Sentence B has a different meaning. Both sentences mean that she had other children out of wedlock after ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
2 votes

"many girls from poor families" VS " many girls in the school"

Unless the reader is unusually precise, I'd say that both #1 and #2 would be taken to express the same as #3. However, this is ELL, so let's be unusually precise. Taking #2 first: There are many ...
tkp's user avatar
  • 7,402
2 votes

we did not know how many

From googling 'knew not how many', I see you have already asked this question on another forum. Yes, the idiom implies 'a lot' - too many to count easily. My impression is that the inverted form with '...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 56.3k
2 votes
Accepted

How to know which words are being modified by a prepositional phrase?

It describes the table. This is because you don't carve the legs of girls. This kind of reasoning is called "pragmatics". You understand which noun phrase is modified partly by syntax (the ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote

We call the shots as we see them

"call the shots" is a metaphor borrowed from the film industry. It would literally mean a film director who "calls" (ie shouts) what scene and what camera angle he/she wants. ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote

we did not know how many

Would you say that (a) and (b) imply that that professor had published a great number of articles? we didn't know how many we knew not how many It's implied the number of published articles must be ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.8k
1 vote

for three thousand dollars

Both of them are correct AND both of them could be parsed to mean you got paid to turn down the job. But context is king, so both would be understood to mean the job was three thousand dollars a month....
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
1 vote

things to make you anxious

"(c) doesn't make sense. You can't make someone anxious just by telling them 'things'." Sorry, but that is simply not true. "I've hired an assassin to kill your wife. He should be on ...
WhatRoughBeast's user avatar
1 vote

the letter that he told you to deliver

Technically, none of those sentences are grammatically correct. When using a relative clause with "which" to modify a noun (and "a" and "b" are actually forms of this too, just with the "which" left ...
Foogod's user avatar
  • 5,839
1 vote

a great technique to keep in mind

No, the sentence is not ambiguous. To say that something is particularly useful for certain purposes is NOT to restrict it to those purposes. To say that a hammer is really useful for knocking in ...
Ronald Sole's user avatar
  • 25.8k
1 vote

a great technique to keep in mind

You could replace "to keep in mind" with "to use" and it would be a bit clearer. On the other hand, the way it is written, the speaker is not necessarily advocating that you use it. When arguing with ...
Havegooda's user avatar
  • 272
1 vote

ambiguity?: to infinitive phrase as a purpose clause or an infinitival relative clause

I would say: a.We asked for a man to communicate with the children b.You need a key in order to open the door. c.Now you can use a key to log into your Google account I would say that is ...
U13-Forward's user avatar
  • 2,117
1 vote

a young woman who is pregnant

It is grammatical. It is a very abbreviated form of description, but I think it preserves the meaning. It also parallels the terse description of the husband. I think he has done it that way because ...
James Random's user avatar
1 vote

when I was at the hospital

You can use those sentences. They are grammatically correct. In terms of style, some people don't like to separate the subject of a sentence from the verb by too many words. If there are too many ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k

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