64

Both are correct, but they have different meanings. Hasn't been - the Present Perfect "My friend hasn't been in church in two weeks" This means that your friend hasn't been in church in the last two weeks. The last time your friend was in church was two weeks ago, and they haven't been to church since then (to the best of your knowledge). Hadn't ...


33

They are both correct, but they mean different things Both of these are correct, idiomatic English. A native English speaker might use either of them. But they would only use the one that fits the situation, because they do not mean the same thing. My friend hasn’t been in church in two weeks. This means that between 14 days ago and today, your friend hasn’...


6

When you use the past perfect (eg had been) you are always, without exception, choosing to describe past events or situations from the viewpoint of a more recent time, but still in the past. In most cases, you have a free choice of whether to view the events from that later point or not; i.e. you can use the past perfect or the simple past: the difference is ...


6

Both forms are grammatical but when they are used is different. My friend hasn't been in church in two weeks. This is the Present Perfect tense. This tense is normally used to refer to an action that began in the past and continues to the present. Consequently, the non-attendance could continue indefinitely. Next week the friend could go to church or not, ...


2

Dumb luck = the way in which something good happens completely by chance, without being planned or deserved. macmillandictionary A little differently, a dumb rush of luck presumably refers to a throw or sequence of throws of the dice in which dumb means by chance, but bad rather than good. So Bors is giving the impression that he has had a run of bad luck ...


2

The first is non-standard. This appears to be a non-standard present perfect with "have" reduced to nothing I have just seen her -> I've just seen her -> I just seen her. The second may be interpreted as the simple past (the past tense of "find" is "found"), which is standard grammar. However most British speakers ...


2

The second sentence is correct. The first is not. You could say I have seen a little boy of about 5-7 years of age taking a grandmother across the street alone! but not Once, I have seen... There is a tense clash there because the "have seen..." indicates an action or condition that was ongoing in the past, but "Once" indicates an ...


1

I think the other answers here are good, but want to give a really clear explanation of the use cases, as I think people (even native speakers!) get this wrong a lot. You would say My friend hasn't been to church in two weeks in most instances, because you usually talk about the present. This means, "Right now, the status is that my friend hasn't ...


1

There is no particular idiom here, not in the version in the novel (a dumb rush of luck) nor on the tv (a rush of dumb luck) Either way, the man is saying that the reason he is winning is just random (ie dumb) luck. And so the girl should roll the dice, since she is likely to win. The present perfect is used as he is describing his current state. "Until ...


1

"Once I saw..." is correct, because the word "once" fixes the experience as a single event in the past. "I have seen..." is a statement about your history of seeing things that is still true. The phrase "moving his grandmother" sounds strange. It should be taking, or even better, guiding.


1

Yes, it is very common. The right side of this NGram shows some of the top hits from books including and excluding for: Either way, it will be understood.


1

For me, neither sentence reads very well. Personally, I would not use either. If the intention is to compare the "something" with things that happened before 20 years ago, then I would not use either: Something has happened in the past twenty years that surely must transcend anything that happened before. If the intention is to compare the "...


1

I hadn't noticed generally means, "I hadn't noticed until you mentioned it" The implication is that, before you mentioned it I hadn't noticed. Now that you have mentioned it I have noticed it (because you mentioned it)


1

While the three say the same thing about the past, they say very different things about the present. “I hadn’t noticed” means I didn’t notice that before, but I do now. “I haven’t noticed” means I didn’t notice that before, and I still don’t. “I didn’t notice” only refers to the past; it says nothing about the present.


1

You only start to play tennis once, at a specific point in time. It’s not a continuous activity. You could say “I have been playing tennis”, because playing tennis is a continuous activity. And so is taking singing lessons.


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