Skip to main content
43 votes

"I told you DON´T go" vs. "I told you NOT TO go"

The second sentence is correct, all of the tenses are in agreement. In the first sentence, "I told you" refers to a past event, but "don't" refers to a future event. You could make the sentence ...
fixer1234's user avatar
  • 5,706
34 votes

"How many psychologists does it take to change a light bulb?"

Both of these are perfectly correct. You could also say "How many psychologists are necessary to change a light bulb?" or "How many psychologists are required to change a light bulb?" However, as ...
Phillip Longman's user avatar
32 votes

"Do never..." vs. "Do not ever..."

We can say things like: Don't ever text while driving. Don't ever do such a foolish and dangerous thing! Never text while driving. Never do such a foolish and dangerous thing! But we don't ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
26 votes

Why can't you say don't instead of won't?

So what you seem to be having trouble with are tenses. The present simple tense can be used for things that happen regularly, sometimes, or never, but also for commands. Don't do that! I sometimes do ...
Liron Ilayev's user avatar
24 votes

"What does prevent x from doing y?" OR "What prevents x from doing y?"

Generally speaking, you don't need auxiliary "do"-verbs in questions if the wh-word is the subject of the main verb. In this case, "what" is the subject of "prevent", so ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 51k
23 votes
Accepted

On June 18th, I did experience my first earthquake

The emphasis would be used if you are contradicting someone, or giving information that is the opposite of what is believed. {two people are describing their trip to Japan} We were in Japan ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
21 votes
Accepted

Which one is correct : 'does it worth all the trouble ?' or 'is it worth all the trouble ?'

Worth may be a noun or an adjective, but not a verb. In your context it is a predicate adjective, almost invariably employed with BE: This house is worth one million dollars. It is worth the ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
16 votes
Accepted

Isn't the word "experience" wrongly used in this context?

Experience is fine. The problem is the done. You don't do an experience1. You have an experience. I have had that experience. That's what he should have said. Or, alternatively, just relied on do ...
SamBC's user avatar
  • 22.8k
13 votes

"Do never..." vs. "Do not ever..."

never and not ever are almost equivalent, but there are some restrictions on the use of the latter. As for do never, in this context it's an oxymoron- two words used together that have, or seem to ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 60.2k
13 votes

"How many psychologists does it take to change a light bulb?"

"It takes x to y" is extremely common, and I'm surprised that you haven't met it before. It is certainly not confined to light-bulb jokes! It means "x is necessary in order to y." Here are some ...
TonyK's user avatar
  • 1,398
12 votes

"I told you DON´T go" vs. "I told you NOT TO go"

Consider a simpler sentence: I like ice cream. When we want to negate this, in English, we need "do", which is called an auxiliary verb. Just adding "not" is not enough. *I not like ice cream. ...
M.A.R.'s user avatar
  • 7,351
12 votes

"What does prevent x from doing y?" OR "What prevents x from doing y?"

Case 2 is the more usual form. Case 1 could be used in very limited instances, in the form of a question, with an emphasis on does, to challenge an assumption that x is prevented from doing y.
vir's user avatar
  • 306
11 votes

Why can't you say don't instead of won't?

In English, it's customary to use the simple future, for making promises, especially promises made on the spur of the moment. Mother: Be careful driving the car 19-year-old son: I will, Mum. ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.9k
11 votes

Why can't you say don't instead of won't?

The imperative in English uses the same form as the bare infinitive: Play tennis! Be good! Don't watch TV. You can see in the last example that when forming an imperative with a negative verb, ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
11 votes
Accepted

"What does prevent x from doing y?" OR "What prevents x from doing y?"

Your gut is right. If your interrogative pronoun is an object, then you get inversion with a dummy auxiliary "do": Cats chase mice → What do cats chase? But if the pronoun is a subject, ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
9 votes

"How many psychologists does it take to change a light bulb?"

Yes, because "take" can mean "require." If three psychologists are standing in line, it's like taking one out of the line to change the light bulb. "It" standing for the task. It's informal, but it ...
Unawarewolf's user avatar
9 votes

On June 18th, I did experience my first earthquake

There may be a circumstances for composing a sentence that way, but not for the reason of emphasis like you ask. If you want to add extra emphasis to the sentence: On June 18th, I experienced my ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
8 votes

"How many psychologists does it take to change a light bulb?"

You appear to have misidentified the subject of the sentence. In questions, word order is often inverted. The subject of the sentence is the word "it," not "many" or "psychologists." The verb must ...
trlkly's user avatar
  • 464
7 votes

"Do never..." vs. "Do not ever..."

And is "never" a contraction of "not ever"? No, but you're close. Never is a compound of "ne (meaning not) + ever, but not a contraction. Source: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=never
Dedwards's user avatar
  • 180
7 votes

Which one is correct : 'does it worth all the trouble ?' or 'is it worth all the trouble ?'

The common idiomatic phrase is "Is it worth X?" or even the seemingly tautological "Is it worth it?" In this case you have to figure out the meaning of the pronouns from context. For example: ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k
6 votes

Simple present or progressive present wiht "say"?

(1) What does the book say? is by far the most natural. A book isn't in the process of saying something; the information is already printed there. For (2), both tenses might be possible, if the ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 57.5k
5 votes
Accepted

Which one to use "Does" or "Is"

You cannot use "do" as a question word with "is". "Do" means to act. The word "do" is used in questions to ask whether the action is being performed or not. While "is" is a verb, it does not describe ...
David42's user avatar
  • 2,850
5 votes

On June 18th, I did experience my first earthquake

Using "did" as an auxiliary like this is (in my experience) very rare. It cannot simply be used in the same places as "didn't", because the "did" there is really just a helper for the "not". As ...
IMSoP's user avatar
  • 4,396
5 votes

Grammar: How many does it costs?

Neither is grammatical. A "cost" or "price" is uncountable, so the only acceptable form is How much does it cost? You could say "How many dollars/pounds/euros does it cost?&...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 76.3k
4 votes

Which one is correct: "what did he do" or "what did he does"?

Of your two example sentences the first is correct What did he do? is the question for something he did in the past. What does he do? is the question for something in the present. the second ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.3k
4 votes
Accepted

Is it possible to drop "do" to make the sentence parallel

If you remove do the meaning changes. Both versions are talking about two groups of people: Those who exercise daily Those who exercise 3-5 times a week. The original sentence has only one meaning: ...
nnnnnn's user avatar
  • 1,894
4 votes
Accepted

Is this sentence grammatically correct - voice use?

Your colleague is quite right. The issue is not the voice — both versions are in the active voice — but the word order: in a question, we invert the subject ("you") and auxiliary verb ("did"). ("You ...
ruakh's user avatar
  • 4,707
4 votes

Question format using did

Yes, there is a different between your two sentences. The difference is that the first sentence is not grammatical (it's simply wrong). Only the second one is grammatical. In English, when you're ...
Michael Rybkin's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Does/do+personal pronoun+verb

It's not the plural form.  It's the infinitive form.  Other than that, you have the right idea.  It can be hard to see that difference.  For most verbs, the plural form and ...
Gary Botnovcan's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible