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41

The second sentence is correct, all of the tenses are in agreement. In the first sentence, "I told you" refers to a past event, but "don't" refers to a future event. You could make the sentence correct, though, with punctuation and minor cleanup: I told you, "Don't go to see that movie because it is not good." In this case, "I told you" refers to a ...


35

Both of these are perfectly correct. You could also say "How many psychologists are necessary to change a light bulb?" or "How many psychologists are required to change a light bulb?" However, as Willow pointed out, "How many X does it take to change a lightbulb?" is a formulaic phrasing for the setup line of a group of similar jokes. It's always said that ...


32

As other answers have pointed out, this is not good grammar, and you are correct that it should be 'be afraid' rather than 'do afraid'. The reason you still hear it is likely due to a troll post on 4chan which became a meme and, as such, was perpetuated by native speakers, even though they knew it was wrong. The original post was in December 2007 and ...


31

We can say things like: Don't ever text while driving. Don't ever do such a foolish and dangerous thing! Never text while driving. Never do such a foolish and dangerous thing! But we don't say "Do never do such a thing".unidiomatic P.S. In contemporary English, the do never {verb} construction is either a formulaic literary holdover from the 17th ...


25

Is it possible to say 'I don't afraid', 'You don't afraid' etc.? No. It is not possible. See, the verb "be" (is, are, was..) is a copular verb. When the copular is or an auxiliary verb is present in a clause, we do not use the so-called do-support when forming a negative version of that clause. We add not instead. It is possible. ("is" is a copular ...


23

The emphasis would be used if you are contradicting someone, or giving information that is the opposite of what is believed. {two people are describing their trip to Japan} We were in Japan for all of June, but we didn't feel any earthquakes I did experience an earthquake on June 18th. The first person states that neither person felt an ...


20

The rule is that Do support is called into play after a Wh-interrogative when subject/auxiliary inversion is called for and the verb is not headed by BE or an auxiliary. Consequently: You do not use do after a Wh- a) when the Wh- word is the Subject of the verb, or is a 'determiner' on the subject—subject/auxiliary inversion does not occur ...


20

Worth may be a noun or an adjective, but not a verb. In your context it is a predicate adjective, almost invariably employed with BE: This house is worth one million dollars. It is worth the trouble. Consequently, you cannot use DO here--there's no verb to act as its complement.


18

Here are the relevant rules: A clause never has more than one finite verb - a verb that is marked for tense, person and number (to the extent that it can be marked for any of these categories. When the verb (predicator) in a finite clause is constructed with auxiliaries (helping verbs), the finite verb is always the first auxiliary in the chain. Each ...


17

Experience is fine. The problem is the done. You don't do an experience1. You have an experience. I have had that experience. That's what he should have said. Or, alternatively, just relied on do alone: Yes, I have done that. Or, indeed, just use the have: Yes, I have. While there's other options, there was nothing wrong with using experience. ...


16

You can say "I don't fear <x>." "I don't have any fear." "I don't feel afraid." "I'm not afraid." Afraid is something you can be (adjective), not something you can do (verb). Unfortunately, "I don't afraid" sounds very wrong to native speakers. Unlike some subtle mistakes that we easily overlook, this one is quite distracting and obvious, at least ...


14

All dictionaries list afraid as an adjective so you can't use it as if it were a verb. Furthermore, the adjective in question can be used only after linking verbs (for example be or feel): I feel afraid. Don't be afraid. Be careful! Afraid is used only after linking verbs such as be and feel. Don't use it in front of a noun. For example, don'...


13

They are correct. They are used as emphasis, though; you should not use "I did go home." every time you mean "I went home." For example, suppose you talk to a friend of yours, and the dialog is the following one. Friend: Where did you go after school? You: I went home. Friend: Strange, Charlie told me you were going to the library. You: I changed ...


13

Consider a simpler sentence: I like ice cream. When we want to negate this, in English, we need "do", which is called an auxiliary verb. Just adding "not" is not enough. *I not like ice cream. I do not like ice cream. * marks the utterance as ungrammatical. Your sentence is a bit different from this, in that its main verb isn't "go", but "tell". ...


13

never and not ever are almost equivalent, but there are some restrictions on the use of the latter. As for do never, in this context it's an oxymoron- two words used together that have, or seem to have, opposite meanings. do 3.1 is a positive imperative (albeit quite a polite one): it tells you that you must do the main verb, whereas never is a negative ...


13

"It takes x to y" is extremely common, and I'm surprised that you haven't met it before. It is certainly not confined to light-bulb jokes! It means "x is necessary in order to y." Here are some examples: It takes courage to do what you did. It takes a lot to rattle her. It takes at least a week to acclimatise to the altitude. And of course: ...


10

When the verb in a statement is neither a primary auxiliary verb (be, have, do) nor a modal auxiliary verb (will, would, can, could, may, might, shall, should, must, ought to, used to), do is used to form a question from it. Thus, ‘You know where my house is’ becomes ‘Do you know where my house is?’ Meanwhile, when the verb in a statement is a primary ...


9

In your first pair Let's not is grammatically "correct" and common in all registers; using it in conversation will not make you sound affected or pedantic. Let's don't is grammatically "incorrect" but often heard informally; it should not be used in formal writing, but will not expose you to scorn if used in conversation. In your second pair Make us ...


9

I didn't go to (the) party I didn't went to (the) party. After the auxiliary verb DO the main verb must be in the plain form. This is the form you see in the dictionary. It does not have any tense. It is not past or present: *He doesn't goes to the gym. (ungrammatical - main verb in present tense) *He didn't saw the film. (ungrammatical - main verb in ...


9

With ordinary sentences we distinguish questions from statements by flipping the subject and the auxiliary verb (Subj/Aux inversion), and if there is no auxiliary in the statement form, we bring in do to serve the auxiliary function (Do support): This time has been very pleasant →Q: Has this time been pleasant? This time seems good to me →Q: ...


9

Yes, because "take" can mean "require." If three psychologists are standing in line, it's like taking one out of the line to change the light bulb. "It" standing for the task. It's informal, but it is still correct as a sentence.


9

You appear to have misidentified the subject of the sentence. In questions, word order is often inverted. The subject of the sentence is the word "it," not "many" or "psychologists." The verb must agree in number with the subject. If you were to answer the question, you would say "It takes five psychologists to screw in a light bulb." Hence the correct ...


9

There may be a circumstances for composing a sentence that way, but not for the reason of emphasis like you ask. If you want to add extra emphasis to the sentence: On June 18th, I experienced my first earthquake. You could say instead: On June 18th, I experienced my very first earthquake or: On June 18th, I experienced my first ever earthquake ...


8

Part 1 In English, the basic sentence structure of a declarative statement is "subject aux verb object". Aux stands for an auxiliary verb which may be missing. For instance, "You have read the book". The subject is "you", the auxiliary verb is "have", the verb is "read". When questions are formed, a transformation called "subject-aux inversion" takes ...


7

You should use the first one: Do you know where Liz lives? You might see something similar to your second construction if it's worded (and punctuated) a little differently. For example: Can you tell me: Where does Liz live? or maybe: What was that guy asking you about just now? Oh, he wanted to know: "Where does Liz live?"


7

No, this is not grammatically correct. Here are some ways you could modify it to make it so: "Guys, did any one of you find my pencil box today in our class?" (note the space between 'any' and 'one' in this version) "Guys, did anyone find my pencil box today in our class?" "Guys, has anyone found my pencil box from our class today?" "Guys, have any one of ...


7

And is "never" a contraction of "not ever"? No, but you're close. Never is a compound of "ne (meaning not) + ever, but not a contraction. Source: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=never


7

The common idiomatic phrase is "Is it worth X?" or even the seemingly tautological "Is it worth it?" In this case you have to figure out the meaning of the pronouns from context. For example: Buying a home can be a difficult, frustrating, and ultimately expensive process -- plus, afterwards, there are all the headaches the comes with home ownership. Is ...


6

SHORT ANSWER: You must omit it. LONG ANSWER: Wh- words like who or when or how or why require inversion and DO-support only when the clauses they head are formal questions. When these words head a relative clause or a dependent clause, the remainder of the clause follows normal order. He has to be punished [implied: because X]. I do not understand. ...


6

The sentences that you have posted are correct, but only in certain situations. These sentences add emphasis to your statement. All of these sentences: I did go home We did make some tea I do listen to future garage music (little mistake here) are usually used when giving a positive answer to a negative question. For eg. Do you not play ...


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