Skip to main content
62 votes
Accepted

"Ice cold" vs. "___ hot" in a professional context?

If you're describing liquids that are too hot for you, use scalding: very hot; burning. e.g. Watch out, the tea is still scaldingly hot! For food or liquids that are a pleasant temperature, use ...
John Clifford's user avatar
31 votes

"Ice cold" vs. "___ hot" in a professional context?

Since you yourself suggested 'steam hot' - the correct version would be steaming hot, so hot that steam is rising from it: adverb (as submodifier steaming hot) Extremely hot: a steaming ...
CompuChip's user avatar
  • 482
24 votes

"Ice cold" vs. "___ hot" in a professional context?

With a certain amount of hyperbole at play, you might refer to something as being red hot. My coffee machine only makes drinks that are ice cold or red hot.
Richard's user avatar
  • 801
17 votes

Why does T S Eliot use "he do" in The Rum Tum Tugger?

I think Eliot wanted to match it with the 'do' in the preceding line. Or it was 'As he does* do' (which — although whimsical — is a grammatical sentence), but he changed the 'does' to 'do' to fit the ...
Void's user avatar
  • 18.1k
11 votes

"Ice cold" vs. "___ hot" in a professional context?

I'm surprised that no one has suggested boiling hot. Maybe it is a British English idiom: Be careful with that cup of tea, it's boiling hot... I've only just poured it. Also, as an example Can ...
Greenonline's user avatar
  • 1,526
10 votes
Accepted

What's this kind of sentence or style called in the grammar terminology?

As far as I know, most typically, this kind of grammar is referred to as the emphatic do. At least, that's the name you see most often used on all those numerous websites dedicated to English language ...
Michael Rybkin's user avatar
10 votes

Why does T S Eliot use "he do" in The Rum Tum Tugger?

It is a subjunctive, but a silly-sounding one, and very "non-natural" which is why the Elliot has used it: for the joke of having "do do". It's not something to use in normal ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
8 votes

Why does T S Eliot use "he do" in The Rum Tum Tugger?

You are perfectly correct: standard English would be "as he does do". But many dialects of English, especially a hundred years ago, used the infinitive form of auxiliary verbs such as do and ...
TonyK's user avatar
  • 1,399
7 votes

Do these sentences mean the same: "He has been found not guilty" and "He has not been found guilty"

They do not mean the same thing! In one, the trial has concluded and the verdict given. In the other, the trial may not have even begun yet. You are correct that "not guilty" is a fixed ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
5 votes

Is "I do drink" a strange form of the Present Simple?

The use of the auxiliary 'do' in conjunction with a positive verb form is used for emphasis, usually to correct a corresponding negative sentence. Consider the following example: Other person: You ...
JMB's user avatar
  • 7,756
4 votes

What is the difference between 'EVERY TIME' and 'EVERY SINGLE TIME'

There's not really any difference in meaning, only in emphasis. When you add the word single, you are intensifying the emotion with which something is said, whether that be frustration (as in the ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
4 votes
Accepted

Care to elaborate?

I've always treated "Care to elaborate?" as a neutral statement without any ill will, additional politeness or passive aggressiveness. It's just a shorthand for the more formal sounding alternative ...
Mara's user avatar
  • 237
4 votes

Emphasis in "Why are you making noise"

Yes, as written, it is ambiguous. You would apply emphasis when speaking. With no special emphasis, I would assume it means the first thing, "What is your reason for making noise?" But that's because ...
spoko's user avatar
  • 637
4 votes
Accepted

to mince vs to mince up

The particle "up" is very common to indicate "completion". It forms separable phrasal verbs with many verbs. Another related sense of phrasal verbs with "up" is "...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
4 votes

Qutation marks in American English for emphasis and bracketing: single or double?

You should not use quotes for emphasis. In your given examples you should not use emphasis at all! The proper way to write this is to remove all single quotes, and replace them with nothing at all. ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
4 votes
Accepted

Word order and focus ("this finding needs to be cautiously interpreted")

There is no difference in meaning between any of those clauses. In each case, what is being mandated is cautious interpretation. Personally, I find “to be cautiously interpreted” slightly awkward and ...
Jeff Morrow's user avatar
  • 32.1k
4 votes
Accepted

Is it natural to say 'never did do something' instead of 'never did something'?

Yes, an expression such as : I never did tell you why I quit. is natural, and might well be used by a fluent speaker. It carries much the same meaning as: I never told you why I quit. but with ...
David Siegel's user avatar
  • 41.2k
4 votes

Is the usage of “that too“ grammatically OK?

I disagree with the poster who answered prior to me. I think in this context "that too" means "on top of" or moreover. The author here is implying that scoring 8 Bands is ...
Neel Sandell's user avatar
4 votes

He is a Captain with the big letter. ( = great captain?)

You're probably thinking of the idiom "with a capital [first letter]," like "He's a Captain with a capital 'C.'" You're right; this doesn't mean quite what you're looking for; it ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 13.5k
4 votes
Accepted

Emphatic statement and questions

Perhaps "emphasis" isn't the most helpful word for OP to use here. The example statement... 1: He does know the truth ...would be unlikely (but not impossible) if it was simply intended to ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Chew longer before swallow

Chew longer before swallowing. is the correct phrase, but often a child will not know what "longer" may mean, so it might be better to say Chew your food 25 times before swallowing. assuming they ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.2k
3 votes
Accepted

Can i use "if and only if" and "then and only then" in the same sentence for emphasis?

I'd say that it's OK. There's no grammatical rule that says you can't do this. I'm guessing that I've seen it done before - though I'd guess it's done more for comedic effect than in a serious way. I'...
Catija's user avatar
  • 25.4k
3 votes

It's not/ It isn't tag questions

1) The sentences are the same. In fact, the emphasis doesn't make a difference in meaning at all as far as I can tell. The first may sound better simply due to how the sentence flows (I'm not a poet, ...
Peyton B's user avatar
  • 563
3 votes

Environmental issues do matter

The sentence is ok, but there is a difference between Environmental issues matter. and Environmental issues do matter. The first sentence is the more simple way to make the statement, and we ...
Jim Reynolds's user avatar
  • 9,997
3 votes

"Ice cold" vs. "___ hot" in a professional context?

Fiery hot or flaming hot work. "Flaming hot" best if there's actual fire involved, e.g. "a flaming hot skillet of fajita toppings". While "fiery hot" might describe the extra spicy sauce for said ...
Darrel Hoffman's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

"fall down to", "fall down in" or "fall down into"? How to emphasis?

You can fall into a pit, or you can fall down a pit, which roughly mean he entered a pit by falling (what I think you intend). Fall down into also seems possible to me, if you take it to be the ...
Em.'s user avatar
  • 45.4k
3 votes

What would be the difference if I use "never once" with perfect aspect sentences?

I would tend to use your third case when there is a continuing relationship with "her", so the occasions (or possibilities) of treating her in any particular way continue to the present (and beyond). ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.8k
3 votes
Accepted

Is this question trying to find out "whether or not the action was done" or "who did it?" A: Did you plant that tree.? B: My father planted it

Answering questions: A: Did you plant that tree? B: My father planted it. Short form: No, I didn't. Short form plus extra information: No, I didn't. My father planted it. Answering by using a ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.5k
3 votes
Accepted

Emphasizing a Sentence in Perfect Tense

"I did come here" is not general emphasis, it means "Although you think I didn't come here, in fact I did." I have come here. The marked stress on the auxiliary has a similar ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
3 votes

Where to place the word "even": 1) "I am amazed even you would choose the day ......" or 2) "I am amazed you would even choose the day ....."

The meaning changes depending on where you put even. I'm just amazed that even you would choose the day after I learn the man I love is dead to try out a new fashion. She is comparing you to other ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 6,940

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible