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21

Normally, the "mixed emotions" comment is intended to be a positive one. The person sending the email is stating that he's sad to see a valuable employee go but happy that the employee found such a wonderful opportunity. Of course, it is entirely possible that the person sending the email isn't happy to see the person go or could care less about the ...


16

The rule for formal letters is that only the first word should be capitalized (i.e. "Best regards"). Emails are less formal, so some of the rules are relaxed. That's why you're seeing variants from other native English speakers. It would never be wrong, however, to continue using "Best regards" for emails. Best regards, godel9


12

I would have no problem with "thanks in advance" at the end of an email sent to me. I would interpret that remark to mean that the person is thankful for whatever assistance I'm able to provide. That said, I can understand why some might find this phrasing off-putting. If you think about it long enough, you can find all sorts of presumptuous or impolite ...


12

It might be better to just say, "Thank you." and omit "in advance." I think this implies that you are grateful that they took their time to consider your request. It would probably be a good idea to thank them again afterward, this time for whatever work they did to help you. Unfortunately, some people (many of whom are very outspoken) will be offended by ...


5

Mail is also used as verb to mean "send an email" ("Mail me when you are ready."), and as noun as synonym of email, such as in the following sentence: "You have got mail."


5

It's a very colloquial phrase. It would be correct in the following context: A. I know what happened to the missing sweets B. I'm all ears However, in a professional email, this is not particularly the best way to phrase it, as it seems quite unprofessional. You could try the following phrase: If you have any suggestions then let me know, and I ...


5

First, look up "consequent". I do not think it means what you think it means -- seems like you're looking for "subsequent". Although even that doesn't quite fit here. I would just say "I apologize for the multiple emails, but . . . " and then explain the reason for the additional email (it's important, something else happened, whatever). That's be kind of ...


5

Works like a charm is an idiom meaning something that beings good luck or success and seems to have magical powers Charms are trinkets which people have for good luck. Examples are rabbit's foot and horse shoes. The expression is informal, but very effective expressively. A formal business equivalent would be The new product is very effective The ...


5

A postscript originated from postscriptum(Latin) meaning post(after) +scriptum*, the past participle of scribere(to write). It is an additional remark at the end of the letter after the signature introduced by P.S.


5

What about snail mail? According to the Cambridge Dictionary snail mail [informal humorous] letters or messages that are not sent by email, but in the post As pointed by Tᴚoɯɐuo, notice that this term is informal and mildly derogatory.


5

The Wikipedia entry for Mail has a few possible terms you could consider. As an AmE speaker, I use the term postal mail to clarify that I'm speaking about physical letters and not electronic messages.


4

The kindest interpretation is that the president is sorry to see the employee leave, but happy to see the employee succeeding.


4

It's an emoticon. Based on the context, it shows your professor's positive reaction to your email. Usually, the variants are: ^^, or (^^,) ^__^ or (^_^) ^-^ . . . ^.^ . . .


4

Without further context, I would say this formal response is appropriate in a business setting. If the person is expecting only one issue to be updated then the singular form could be used. Normally, the issue(s) would either be understood or mentioned previously in the correspondence. I look forward to receiving your update For a slightly less ...


4

"For your kind information" seams to appear only in Indian English. The adjective "kind" here describes "information". Here's to ask then "Can information be kind?" or "What is kind information?" - this doesn't make sense. Information cannot be kind (it can be good or bad; helpful or not, but not kind) and therefore it is a semantically incorrect usage of ...


3

"An informed leave" is correct. From https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/540/01/ . . "If the noun is modified by an adjective, the choice between a and an depends on the initial sound of the adjective that immediately follows the article: a broken egg an unusual problem a European country (sounds like 'yer-o-pi-an,' i.e. begins with consonant 'y' ...


3

I would say "I'm part of Acme's technical team." Another good example is "this online survey is part of my school project"


3

It has been used that way, most markedly by AOL back in the early '00s, but is really isn't used that way, at least in the US, or at least in the parts of the US where I have lived. Some people may understand your meaning, others wouldn't. If you were to ask me to "mail" something to you, I would be confused, and take a few seconds to catch on. But if you ...


3

You can ask someone to mail you, but should you? Please mail me the file doesn't sound right to me. If we usually email each other and don't use postal mail, I would understand what you mean. But, I might be confused for a moment, or stop to think that it sounded awkward. Even though mail as a noun sometimes means electronic mail, mail as a verb like in ...


3

There is nothing grammatically wrong with your sentence, but I would very much suggest not using it. Jay gives some excellent suggestions in his answer, which I wholeheartedly endorse, but I take a stronger position that you shouldn't use the sentence in your question. My thoughts: This is your proposed subject line: Introducing myself as an aspiring [...


3

As a statement by itself, I'm part of Acme's technical team. is more natural. But you could use an article as emphasis or when contrasting with other information. He is a part of Acme's technical team, even though he does not contribute much. (after making a big contribution) You see, I am a part of Acme's technical team.


3

I agree with the earlier comment; I think this phrase is too informal for an email to customers. That said, I think this expression would be fine in an email to coworkers and colleagues, where a degree of informality is more acceptable. However, I'd probably use a dash instead of a comma: If you have any feature suggestion then let me know – I'm all ...


3

Not on subject line but inside the e-mail I'd use “Dear Sir/Madam” rather than just “Dear.” If you just write "Dear" it makes it sound like a love letter.


3

In my experience "J Smith" is used more often than "John S". For example, when quoting someone it's common to just use initials for all their names, except the surname. e.g. "C. S. Lewis". I haven't come across "John S" very often. I guess someone might use it for confidentiality reasons... e.g. reception staff at my work do that on their name badges. ...


3

Please find attached "Monthly status report" PDF for your reference would be appropriate; you cannot enclose anything in an email because they don't have envelopes. However (in my opinion) a more formal phrasing would be something like Please find the pdf "Monthly status report" attached for your reference or, shortly put Please find the file ...


3

Salutations are culturally freighted, and the most appropriate salutation to use depends on the locale, the social distance between the correspondent and the recipient, and the medium. A style manual may be helpful when seeking consistency in such things as business correspondence, and in that spirit, I shall quote from an etiquette book: “Honored Sir” ...


3

Note that, in all cases here, it is assumed that you want to address both equally. Keeping that in mind, I would say that your first sentence is the better choice, unless: The persons share a surname: for example, if you are writing to a married couple you may wish to address them as: Mr and Mrs Smith Mr and Mrs J Smith Mr and Mrs John Smith Note ...


3

You should use This is when you are being asked to introduce yourself. for example when you join a conference call and someone asks Who's this? or Who's the new caller? Then you should say Hello, Mr./Mrs.Green. This is Jamie. But when you are introducing yourself first then you should go with following: Hello Mr./Mrs.Green. It is Jamie.


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