56

You are correct: me is the object pronoun and should be used here, since it is going in the object position. Normally you would probably say "keep us updated", so "keep him and me updated" may feel a bit off even though it's perfectly correct. As to the people who tell you that you should always use "I" in conjunction with a name: they are WRONG, WRONG, ...


54

You are absolutely correct. "How do you do" is an old fashioned introduction and is an obsolete synonym of "hello", and consequently the proper response is "how do you do?". Mr Darlington: How do you do, Mrs Windermere? Mrs Windermere: How do you do, Mr Darlington? This exchange is exactly equivalent to the more modern (and at ...


35

Weird. I would think they meant credit card bill but you say that’s not what they meant. Maybe my was a typo of by - “Can I pay by credit card?” This is the only way I could see them meaning they wanted to use their credit card to pay for something.


33

I think it's still simpler than any of the other answers yet. Just remove the other party and determine which version of 'I'/'Me' work for the sentence. I went to the store. Sue made a cake for me. Then, add the other party back into the sentence, putting the other party first: Tom & I went to the store. Sue made a cake for my friend &...


21

It doesn't sound correct. Pay by credit card means pay the shop Pay with my credit card means pay the shop Pay my credit card bill means pay the bank Pay my credit card might be understood as paying the bank, but is informal and not a standard usage My guess is it was possibly misheard or a mistake on the part of the speaker/writer.


20

How do you do? is a bit formal sounding; at least here in the U.S., we'd usually use the more informal How are you? instead. How are you? (or, even more informally, How ya' doin'?) is indeed used as a greeting as often as it is as a genuine inquiry, although there are, of course, some exceptions. If I had been in an accident, for example, and was paid a ...


13

In my region (Upstate NY, American English) it is a little different. We do answer the question, although the answer can vary. The customary greeting is "How are you?" The response: If I wish to be polite and brief, I will say "I am well. How are you?" ("well", "doing good", "very well" all interchangeable here. "Well" is more formal than "good". "I'...


13

The contraction of "is" in "it's" can only occur if the "is" is relatively unstressed, which cannot be the case when it is final in a sentence or clause. Consequently, contractions like "it's" and "I'm" never occur at the end - they are always expanded, so that some stress can go on the verb "is" or "am". This is very noticeable when a lyricist ...


13

I think you have some selection bias in your observation. For example, none of your example loanwords were added to English "nowadays", but rather during the 1700s and early 1800s, per quick google searches. As a general rule, it depends a) who is using the loan word, and b) what languages they are familiar with. If the loanword is primarily used ...


12

Thank you for your clarification. Thank you for the clarification. Thank you for clarifying [describe the thing that was clarified].


12

This looks an example of understatement used for emphasis, I suspect it's peculiarly British although it may be used elsewhere. Delighted, as I'm sure you know, means very pleased. Less than delighted literally means simply not delighted. In theory, a person who is "less than delighted" might be anything from very cross indeed up to quite pleased. In ...


11

"Phrasal verbs" are very common in English and have been around for a long time. Some are very old, some are recent inventions. Each has its own history and usage. Some of them are entirely acceptable in all registers: okAristotle refers to the effect of ethos and pathos on an audience. okI'm pretty sure that SOB was referring to me when he said that....


11

There is no single authority to which one would turn to determine whether phrasing is "formal" enough for a situation; sometimes, even in an academic paper or a public address, colloquial phrasing is more communicative of tone, region, familiarity, and so forth. Whether it is acceptable is a judgment your audience makes. Merriam-Webster does not ...


10

Understatement is an arrow in the rhetor's quiver. Some folks use it more than occasionally. OK, now why did I say "more than occasionally" instead of "frequently"? Because I like using the rhetorical figure of understatement. A variation on understatement is litotes (lie' toe tease), such as "There was no small stir among the protesters," instead of "...


9

There is no difference in meaning although there are a few differences in usages. Here, there is virtually no difference: You are flying to Belgium tomorrow. You're flying to Belgium tomorrow. However, there are places where the two are not interchangeable. For example, this particular contraction cannot be used at the end of a sentence, or as a ...


9

HAVE got is an idiom equivalent to HAVE. I've got a report to do = I have a report to do Have you got time to read this? = Do you have time to read this? In Standard English (whatever that is), bare got, without a form of HAVE, is simply the past form of GET. It cannot be substituted for HAVE or HAVE got. Your example would be understood to be asking ...


9

In a formal setting, it is best to say something like this (while smiling and extending your hand, if appropriate): "Hello, my name is Joseph Biotech. It is a pleasure to meet you. May I ask your name?" There are unlimited ways to express this, but it is always more polite to introduce yourself before asking for a person's name.


8

A lot of the language used in these situations is based on the speaker's relationship to people serving them. This is based on how I would speak, and I tend to be more casual and friendly with people serving me. There are many native speakers of English who are rude to the concierge however. I would start with a hello, as the concierge or receptionist is not ...


8

Your understanding is correct. The reason that people often say things like "keep Tom and I updated" is a bit convoluted. I see Hellion has put an answer up while I'm writing this, and what he says is correct. Colloquial AmE often substitutes me for I in the subject of the sentence when there is more than one person involved (e. g. "Me and Tom went to ...


8

"Between you and me" is historically correct, but many native English speakers -- perhaps especially my fellow Americans -- do not know this. I suspect that the confusion comes from the fact that "you" and "you" are indistinguishable, so people get used to "You and I" as a subject and then use "you and I" as an object. This is not helped by the fact that ...


8

I think what you're asking is "Is 'in layman's terms' formal enough for an academic paper?" The answer is yes, it is OK to use that expression in your paper. It is not informal or slang. As Alan recommended in his comment 'in layperson's terms' is a good alternative if you want to make an effort to use gender-neutral terms. I personally think that ...


7

The difference between formal and informal registers lies in the rules which are followed, not the medium of delivery. They are for all practical purposes different dialects of the language. Formal utterances follow the rules which obtain in written academic works. They characteristically strive for careful construction with complex subordination, close ...


7

It is well is an old-fashioned and quite formal phrase meaning approximately it is worthy of approval, so It is not well means “You shouldn’t do that” or “That’s a bad idea”, but considerably politer. Well was for many centuries used regularly as a predicate adjective in a number of senses, some of which last to this day,...


7

Always split the sentence in such dilemma. Make those two people in concern separate and check what works! You will go to London + Me I will go to London. SO, You and I will go to London. She'll meet you + She will meet I me. SO, She'll meet you and me. Take your sentence: Both you and he are happy = You are happy + He is happy ~ Yes! Both you and him are ...


7

There is no real difference between the two phrases. "X needs Y" or "X has need of Y" mean the same thing. "X has need of Y" is a pretty formal construction. You'll come across it in older writings and novels. You'll also find it in legal documents. From my experience, it's not used very often in everyday speaking except when someone is trying to be overly ...


7

Works like a charm is an idiom meaning something that beings good luck or success and seems to have magical powers Charms are trinkets which people have for good luck. Examples are rabbit's foot and horse shoes. The expression is informal, but very effective expressively. A formal business equivalent would be The new product is very effective The ...


6

It would be a perfectly normal introductory exchange in formal situations in the UK.


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