92

"Come in" is permission, offered to someone who has asked for it (by knocking, for example). Unsolicited, it sounds imperative, or presumptuous; though of course this can be moderated by tone of voice or other context. "Come on in" is an invitation, much better as an unsolicited offer to someone who may not have been intending to enter. Offered to someone ...


40

"Come on in" has the same meaning as "come in" but is a more folksy way of extending the invitation. It suggests a kind of rural, down-home hospitality that is redolent of (American) TV shows of the '50s, which were ever a myth (although a persistent one) about how friendly people in the hinterland were. This is an AmE usage, so I wouldn't expect to ...


37

I'd personally go with this example: Come over to my place, dude. I'll treat you to a delicious pizza. to treat means to give someone something, typically food, either because they've done something good to you or you're simply doing it out of sheer generosity. As for your examples, they sound weird. Come over to my home bro! I will make you eat a ...


29

Native speakers would typically say "I have never been here before" in this context. You are talking about the place where you are currently, so here is correct. But the sentence "I have never been here" sounds self-contradictory: how can you have never been in the place where you are right now? Adding before restricts the "have never been" to the past ...


28

There's the expression hang up the phone. But there may be others, more fitting for modern phones.


28

I will eat you a pizza doesn't make sense. I will make you eat a pizza means I will force you to eat a pizza. This does not suggest that it is a treat. Maybe you were thinking of I will make you a pizza. This means that you will make a pizza for the friend. I want to take a treat from you means that you want to take a thing away from the person. That thing ...


20

I believe the phrase "my treat" covers this, as in: Come over to my place for pizza, my treat. "my treat" was referenced in another stack exchange question here:


18

It is never easy to answer why a particular colloquial phrase is used. It just is. In this case I speculate that "come in" on its own might be thought to be slightly less encouraging than "come on in". You say "come in" if someone knocks on your door, and in that context it means "you may come in (if you really want to)". Whereas if you want to encourage ...


16

You cannot use I haven't known that here. The present perfect describes a present state which arises out of a prior eventuality, and you are implicitly saying that your present state is that you do know that—which is not a state that can arise out of your previous ignorance. (It can emerge from your previous ignorance, but it can only arise out of learning ...


15

It has both meanings of praise and thankfulness That's very kind of you That's very nice of you That's very thoughtful of you That's very sweet of you often accompanied by "thank you" Thank you, that's very kind of you.


15

It's a bit more complicated: ..., you know,... inserted somewhat randomly is one of those typical "fillers" with little to no semantic content. In almost all cases the speaker could simply leave it out - but so they could do with well,.... erm.... etc. Hint: There will often be a small break in the "flow" of the speech, a deep breath while the speaker ...


14

You can almost always say "No thank you", which is polite enough on its own, but if you'd like to give a longer response, you could say something like: No thank you. I appreciate the offer, but I'll be fine on my own. Sometimes making your reply a little bit longer like this can make you seem more gracious and less brusque. If you appear to be hurt, it ...


14

I think there is a scene with Humphrey Bogart where this exchange takes place: Blonde: Would you mind buying me a drink? Bogart: Why, yes I would (he says as he turns towards her and stares into her eyes) Answering with yes I would will usually result in some further conversation since there is some ambiguity in the answer. Those additional ...


13

Looking at these different sentences formed correctly about an idea, I don't think the OP's English is poor or bad. I would advise him not to be so humble. Nevertheless, he can use any of the sentences that he thinks is suitable.


13

It's a common English language twist. Even in my own family someone might say: Would you mind taking out the trash? Which if you say "Yes", can mean either: "Yes, I'll take out the trash." "Yes, I would mind taking out the trash." So what people do when hit with the "would you mind..." question is to answer it completely. "No problem, I need to go ...


11

I often say: [It's] Nice of you to offer, but I think I've got it. or ... but I think I can manage it. [Thanks [though]] or for your second scenario: Nice of you to offer, but I think I'm okay. [Thanks [though]] Adding "I think" also softens the response and makes it less brusque.


11

It's very much slang. The person is trying to show empathy with the person or confirm agreement. It could be interpreted as "I am understanding and feeling the same emotions as you", or simply "I understand and agree". For the Sci-Fi nerds, it's a more casual version of Avatar's "I see you".


11

At an interview, you should not be too effusive with your greeting, or too verbose (unless invited by a leading question intended to draw you out). The interview panel makes the moves, so I suggest you be polite and uncontroversial. Good morning / afternoon is sufficient, with a brief look around the interviewers to make it clear you are greeting them ...


10

What you said is correct and natural. You use "here" when the place is near your current position, while "there" is used when the place is far from you. So, in the situation that you were already there, and you wanted to talk about the place you were in then "here" is the correct word of choice.


9

I disagree with tchrist on "That I don't know" being unusual. It is very common but has a different connotation. Saying "That I don't know" would be said when you had already answered a question or two, but did not know the answer to the current question. As in What time are we leaving? Five o'clock Who's driving? I am. Is Barry going ...


9

The question needs more clarity. Also, it's one of my colleagues. We use plural after one of X. To me, it seems that you know that he's single but asking him the experience of marriage and not the status. Especially your words any marriage experience! This brings up the probability of asking whether the answerer has married at least once in his lifetime. :)...


8

Cow Tipping on Wikipedia notes: "Cow tipping is the purported activity of sneaking up on an unsuspecting upright cow and pushing it over for entertainment. The practice of cow tipping is generally considered an urban legend, as cows do not sleep standing up, and the implication that a cow can be pushed over and not stand up again is incorrect, as, unless ...


8

Your first sentence isn't a common construction. The only way I'd say "Did you X before?" is when the order of events is part of the question: "I went for a run" "Did you stretch before [that]?" (or more likely "Did you stretch beforehand?" or "Did you stretch first?") So choosing between your two questions I choose the second, but that's because the ...


8

Normally you just say: I don’t know. Sometimes when you want to draw attention to the thing unknown, you might venture to add an object: I don’t know that. But it would be rare indeed to apply inversion to put the now-important bit first: That, I don’t know.


8

It's true that this and that are relative to distance. For phone conversations, the distance is metaphorical. In the case of phone conversations, "this" is who you are talking to. If you heard someone in the background talking (i.e. a voice in the distance on the other side of the line) you could say "Who's that?"


8

I understand we use “I’ll (will)” when we decided to do something at the time of speaking in the former case. I don't believe this distinction is widely recognized by native speakers. In any case, the coffee shop person doesn't know or care whether you made your decision on the spot or had decided what drink to have before you came in. "I'll have an ...


8

"How much time do you have" is certainly idiomatic, but it is usually used in a sense of "How much time do you have available, that I may be able to make use of with you?". So it would not be used of journeying time (unless you are planning to have a conversation while the person is travelling). "How much time will it be before you get here?" is fine, but ...


8

"Come on" is a phrase of its own used to encourage/invite. (And express exasperation, but that's not a relevant usage to this conversation). "Come in" is very similar phrase but it used exclusively for entering. "Come on in" combines the two phrases in order to emphasize the message that the ones being adressed are welcome.


7

The suggestions in comments are good, but I tend to identify myself so they don't have to ask (especially if you think it might be a job opportunity!) I'd go with something like this: Hi, this is [your name]. I have a missed call from this number, and I just wanted to call you back and see what you were calling about. This is a bit wordier and more ...


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