15

There are myriad ways to express a sentiment similar to the one you describe. Here are a few examples: The above is purely for your information. This is solely by way of information. I write this simply to keep you informed of the situation. . . . keep you apprised . . . . . . keep you in the loop. In my experience (mainly in the world of ...


15

The subtle difference between the two is that "fits" will be usually said of things, items, objects, while "suits" will be used with services, operations, activities, or entities performing them (people, companies). The difference is very slight though and it's certainly not an error to use one in the context of the other. In your case, ...


14

Although I understand that you are very busy, I would appreciate it if you could provide a response as soon as possible. I very much appreciate your time. My exact wording might change according to the circumstances – How well do I know the person? How important is it that I get timely feedback? Is this the first time I'm asking, or the third? What is the ...


14

Your interpretation is correct. "It" refers to the capture of the drone under the described conditions. I had completely missed the extra "a" hiding in plain sight. Yeah, that's a typo. It should read "...is not a combat vessel".


13

In AmE, you weren't a tutor, a teacher, or a trainer. Broadly speaking, a tutor's primary job is to help with homework; the teacher was the "real teacher" that was there; a trainer usually helps with physical training (but not always). The term that I could think of was guest speaker. From M-W guest speaker a person invited to a gathering to give a ...


11

My experience is that saying specifically what you appreciated is the most expressive way to say thank you. Any phrase you could use in more than one situation will have about the same impact as a simple thank you. In my experience, this is true for both written and spoken appreciation. For example, "Thank you for helping me outside of your normal office ...


11

First of all, please note that the usage "Mr. Firstname" or "Miss Firstname", as in your example, are conventional only in specific subcultures of English speakers; I encountered it for the first time when I was working with prison inmates. (I am unaware of any community of English speakers that would utter "Mrs. Firstname".) Properly speaking, which is to ...


10

This is from Merriam Webster's discussion of these phrases: Meanwhile and meantime can both be nouns or adverbs and are interchangeable. "Meantime" is more frequently seen as a noun, in the phrases "in the meantime" and "for the meantime." "Meanwhile" is usually seen as an adverb, such as in "meanwhile, back at the farm." If you follow the link you'll ...


9

I think the word you're looking for is long-term. We refer to long-term benefits or long-term goals. Long run would make more sense like this: I know it seems difficult now, but these changes will make things better in the long run. Long-term is hyphenated because it's a compound adjective. The long run is not; I'm pretty sure it's a noun phrase.


8

Disciplines which follow the APA's Publications Manual are sternly (and to my mind ludicrously) literal-minded about such temporal references, but to the best of my knowledge everybody else in academe accepts the ancient convention that a text which still 'speaks' to a present-day audience does so in the present tense. However: if you're going to shift your ...


8

If you don't know the gender or name of the person you are writing to, I would just use Dear Sir or Madam. Mx. is not a widely recognized title in the English language.


7

It's not at all apparent from the dictionary definitions, but: Dough is relatively firm and can be picked up in the hands, balled up, kneaded, rolled, and otherwise manipulated into various shapes. Batter is much more liquid and needs to be spooned, ladled, or poured out; to achieve a specific shape (other than a large, flat circle), you need a mold or a ...


7

It's perfectly fine to use the present tense for all research, even going back to ancient times; see here for another question about this. However, there is a way that you can usefully shift tense in a literature review in a scientific paper. You can use the present tense for recent research that is still a topic of current conversation—especially if your ...


7

What sounds normal depends on the culture of your boss and your "senior", your company, and other factors. One safe choice in most business situations around the world would be: Dear John Wu and Jane Smith,


6

A résumé or cover letter is supposed to be short, clear, and impress the reader. Taking time and space to define a word is a waste of space in a résumé or cover letter. A neologism is a newly-defined word. If the meaning of a neologism is not perfectly clear, you need to define it the first time you use it. Unfortunately, the meaning of "practicalize" is ...


6

So on is not super formal, but will be found in a lot of relatively formal writing. I would not avoid it without having some specific reason to expect that it would be rejected. I've seen it in legal judgements. So forth is a little more formal, but basically means the same thing. You might use "and likewise for each successive layer. You can also make it ...


6

In general contractions are avoided in formal writing. But this is a matter of style, not a rule. As for the cases you list in the question: (1) Academic literature, Contractions are generally avoided in such works. (2) novels This varies widely. Some authors use contractions freely in expository and narrative text, others do not. (3) news ...


5

Tricky is not a formal word. Some people will say that it is informal. Some people will say that it is ok to use it in informal and formal writing. Difficult and challenging are more formal than is tricky.


5

Merriam–Webster's Dictionary of English Usage (MWDEU) has an entry for 'admit of'. It quotes Fowler (1926) pointing out "that the combination 'admit of' is more limited in application than it once was and that it usually takes a nonhuman subject" (emphasis mine). MWDEU lists the following examples of use with a nonhuman subject: [...] questions ...


5

If you're just standing about by the door, blocking someone else from going through, obviously you should apologise while moving out of the way, so Pardon me or Excuse me would seem reasonable. Unless you want to make a virtue of being there, saying Allow me [to open the door] as you open it. If you also intend to go through the door, After you as you step ...


5

I do agree with the answer from Mowser, 'updated' would generally work. But something more natural would be 'new.' Is there any new information? May I know if there is any new information? Please let us know if there is any new information on this issue. Side note: the second one sounds a little stilted. I would just say: Please let me know ...


5

The comment above is correct. What you are describing is the "difference". Likewise, C= A*B is the "product" of two expressions and C= A/B is the "quotient". Hope this helps!


5

Because of your situation: I've said that I can stay after school to make up the test, but I found out that I have a band rehearsal tomorrow. Your request to reschedule is a form of asking permission which can be phrased using either would which would sound neither too formal nor informal. Is it okay for you if I take it on wednesday after school ...


5

The first is more polite while the second is more impersonal and better suited to a corporate or institutional setting where the recipient might not have a relationship with the writer. Both are however too wordy; the recipient knows you're informing her by the fact that you're sending her a message. 'Asked for' is also too colloquial for a business or ...


5

It appeared calculated to show China's naval reach . . . It appeared calculated can be interpreted in two ways. You can interpret "calculated" as an adjective, meaning "it appeared to be planned and intended", which would follow the pattern "subject+appear+adjective". It's normally interchangeable with "it appeared as adjective". The interpretation which ...


5

is there an implication that heck has a meaning of to have slight sex with someone Nope. Heck is a neutered version of hell (which isn't too vulgar these days, but still "adults only" for the most part) and has nothing to do with fuck (which is still considered very vulgar). Why the hell is she here? (inappropriate for children to say) Why the heck ...


5

It's quite an informal term, and I wouldn't expect to see if in formal writing. What you could easily do, however, is phrase it as: So-called "workaholics" may neglect their families and friends. It's a term that is widely used, and you're still referencing it. But because of its formality (or lack thereof), you're not including it as part of your ...


4

Your friend's version attempts to ‘smooth’ your rhetoric and add what he takes to be an important additional consideration—that the applications you will develop will be appropriate to all conceivable users and situations. But he has changed your meaning. Your version names three abilities which the courses will hone: information ...


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