33

"Front page news" is a synonym for the important or notable story. It's the news that's important enough to put on the cover of the newspaper. So, page 14 news would be, in comparison, very unimportant, or not at all noteworthy, novel or interesting. The irony is that a massive attack on the Pentagon would be expected to be all of those. Unless of course,...


28

When you are asking a question about how to do something, the preferred way to ask would be to use "How do I..." (or "How can I...", or "Where would I..."): How do I plant flowers in my garden? How do I transpose flute music for clarinet? How can I get my two-year-old to stop misbehaving? Where can I get more information about asking questions in ...


26

Why we listen to music is a noun phrase. Why do we listen to music? is a well-formed question. Either could work as the title of an article, say, or a blog post. Titles are not required to be well-formed sentences, but they can be. The Cat in the Hat For Whom the Bell Tolls Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? I Saw What You Did


18

Why are news headlines written as "He says ..." or "He kills ..." instead of "He said ..." or "He killed ..."? That is because news headlines are written in a compressed telegraphic style, also known as headlinese. It might be the best for learners to read this writing style differently from ordinary English. This style has its own special rules of grammar....


18

The title is written in headlinese, a specific style for newspaper headlines. Headline writers often pick a noun where an adjective would've been more logical (in a general-purpose text). As the article in WIkipedia states, "Country names are often used instead of their adjective form."


18

The line you are asking about, as you have stated, is a title of a journalistic piece. It is written in the style of headlinese. So the language is pithy to the point that it does not conform to general English grammar. For example, to frack shale gas site is not grammatical, because the indefinite article a is missing. The grammatical way of saying it ...


15

Why We Listen To Music=The Reason We Listen to Music versus: Why Do We Listen To Music? = A question. Titles of written texts (books or articles) can be quite complicated. In the examples above, one is in question form, a typical magazine style, and one is in statement form, which also happens to be a full sentence. That does not mean that all magazine-...


14

The idiomatic use of the word leave is problematic, to be sure! Moreover, the sentence in question is, at best, poorly stated! Perhaps an illustration would help. Let's say two guys are bemoaning not having a suit to wear to a special occasion to which they've both been invited. One guy says, "I may not have a suit to wear, but I have a cousin who does, ...


14

The sentence is written in "headline English" - no articles or linking words, a compressed summary. In a first for the UK, the Government clears (allows) the Cuadrilla company to frack (obtain gas from shale rock by a fracturing process) at a site (not slide). "A first" means the first time that something happens. In first for UK, government clears ...


12

A complete sentence would be "Penguins are not allowed" or its variation "No penguins are allowed". However, on signs you can often find abbreviated sentences in which the verb is omitted (and often "be" can be implied). Common examples are "(there is) no entrance", "pedestrian crossing (is ahead)", "road (is) blocked". A sign saying "no penguins" would be ...


11

Is this an error? Is it slang? Does it sound OK to native speakers? Let's remove the extraneous material from the sentence: The presenter baffled viewers by remaining to wear her wedding ring. This is comprehensible, but it isn't idiomatic unless the reporter was trying to say that the presenter remained on stage after the performance in order to wear (...


11

I don't think the answers sufficiently cover "What's the difference between "Why We Listen to Music" and "Why Do We Listen to Music"?". It's possible that it should simply be a separate question, but I'll explain the difference here anyway. The title of an article, in broad strokes, is an indication of what the content of that article is. An article titled "...


10

How to do X is not a question but an NP, a clause which behaves like a noun†. It has no subject-auxiliary inversion I am asking you [how to do X]. Notice the absence of a question mark. How to do X works just fine as a title, however. Tutorials are often called How-tos because they don't ask questions but answer them. This module teaches you [...


10

This headline could be ambiguous, if the monument was of somebody else. He in that sentence does not grammatically have to refer to either Cook or Jobs. It could be completely ambiguous. However, the reason the Washington Post could use this headline is because they said: Cook says he's gay. Most people know that Steve Jobs died a while ago, so because ...


10

Newspaper headlines, and titles in general, are often not complete, grammatically-correct sentences. Many people have had great fun pointing out clumsy wording and ambiguity in headlines. But this case is far from the worst. The headline has a series of verbs and nouns, each of which is modified by a phrase acting as an adverb or adjective. As I think ...


9

In addition to the satirical content as explained by Euan M, the grammatical meaning may not be immediately obvious because it's written in headlinese. There's implicitly an "is" between "Pentagon" and "Page", so in plain English the headline would be "[A] Massive Attack On [The] Pentagon [Is] Page 14 News". This example could be especially confusing since ...


9

You're right that this is not a complete sentence. It is using a different grammar, one that is often used for titles (of books, papers, reports) and official notices. It is similar to Headlinese (in grammar, though not so much in vocabulary). The first characteristic mentioned for Headlinese in the Wikipedia article I linked is "Forms of the verb "to be" ...


9

Headlines tend to be short, instead of being fully grammatical sentences. This particular headline is not even literally true. In this example, "Advantage" is not an adjective describing "Australia". Instead, the headline is designed to resemble a description of a tennis score during a game or set. A tennis match consists of sets, which consists of games. ...


8

I would prefer your original "first three quarters of 2014" as it is unambiguous. However, these alternatives may be acceptable: ZZZ sales up 20% in Q1-Q3 2014 ZZZ sales up 20% in 2014, quarters 1-3


8

It is "news-speak" for this: "The second-largest school district in the United States was closed [when? today?] because of a threat [how was it received and from whom?] that New York officials later concluded was a hoax that ‘mirrored recent episodes’ of the television show 'Homeland.'" "The hoax," as you already pointed out, was the "threat." And you are ...


7

I disagree with Jonathan Garber's comment that "antennas" is "certainly not standard". I would draw the same distinction Random House does: The plural of "antenna" in technical contexts, as when talking about an antenna on a radio, is usually "antennas". The plural of "antenna" in biological contexts, as when talking about the antennae on an ant, is almost ...


7

Also be aware of a tense called "historical present" used to describe events in the past as if they just happened or are still happening. For example: "The year is 1964. The British invasion of America is in full swing while the American invasion of Vietnam is just starting."


7

About is being used with sense 5 as given at m-w.com: in the vicinity : near There is an ellipsis, but it is Look out, [there is a] mantis about. You could consider this to be a "headline-ese" or "announcement/warning" sort of ellipsis, although it does also improve the meter of the phrase to make it a better rhyming couplet. The phrase as a ...


7

Another possibility is to simply say it like this: Record added. That's short for "[The] record [has been / was] added." You will see that sort of thing all the time in software. Message sent. File deleted. Users don't like to read a lot of text. It's good to get straight to the point with them.


7

This is a special style of newspaper headlines. Articles, auxiliary verbs and "be" are often left out to save space. Actor dies. (An actor has died.) There's no generalization at all.


7

The first novel in the book series does have the article: A Game of Thrones. The producers must have decided that they like the shorter title, probably because it rolls off the tongue better. Like user178049 said, titles have their own styles and rules. Here are some titles of books one could say are missing articles: Lord of the Flies Animal Farm Brave ...


6

The correct plural form is indeed antennae, but a lot of words with unusual plural forms are often incorrectly pluralized with 's'es. So the writer is not correct, but likely doesn't know that. A few more examples of words with non-standard plural forms which people will sometimes pluralize incorrectly with 's' or 'es', selected from a list here: syllabus (...


6

Good question. The short answer is there's no way of knowing except by context. If we treat both of OP's examples as "valid sentences", the grammatical context clearly establishes that asked should be a past tense verb (since no other word could feasibly be acting as a verb). So in neither case is it really credible to interpret asked as an "adjectival* ...


6

This is a great question, and there's a lot of ambiguity in every-day speech between those. Honestly, in my experience, we generally just accept the ambiguity and depend on some context to understand what was meant. I started that sentence expecting to provide a sufficient way of jumping around the confusion, but I don't have one. You could say "...Apple ...


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