Questions tagged [modifiers]

A modifier is a word (generally an adjective, or a noun used as attribute) that changes the sense of the head noun.

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What is the real meaning of “quite a little number of …”?

quite a few - phrase used with countable nouns quite a few apples -> many apples quite a little - phrase used with uncountable nouns quite a little money -> much money but what about quite a ...
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Is the bold marked in the below sentence a prepositional phrase? If not what is it?

The budget proposes spending 24.5 percent of G.D.P. over the next decade, up from a baseline of 22.7 percent. In the above sentence, is the part marked bold a prepositional phrase? If not, what is it?...
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Placement of Modifiers

He left the unfinished work. He left the work unfinished. Other examples can be(in present participle) He left the crying child. He left the child crying. What is the difference between 1 and 2 ...
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Conversion of words into definitions

‘Very sharp’ Sharp: having an edge or point that is able to cut or pierce something. Very: in a high degree. What word of the definition of ‘sharp’ is modified by ‘in a high degree’? I think it’s ...
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Can adjectives not only modify a noun but also a noun phrase?

Can adjectives not only modify a noun but also a noun phrase? In the same way, can adverbs not only modify an adjective but also an adjective phrase? Why don’t any grammar books say modifying a phrase?...
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what's the difference between “of” and “being” modifier?

I found a sentence as the following: we have the prerequisites being algorithms for NLP that's not absolutely required but they will be expecting that you have at least some background here. does ...
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Doesn’t an adjective describe a meaning of the noun? [closed]

I don’t understand ‘once-young adult’ is a possible phrase. Adjectives should describe a meaning of a noun, but ‘once-young’ does not qualify the noun because ‘adult’ means an old person.
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Can I get an answer from one logic question?

Although only half of a dish is red, can I call it ‘red dish’? Or only when an entire dish is red, can I call it ‘red dish’?
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Question on omission of “by” and location of modifiers

I am a nonnative graduate student writing science related journals. Whenever I write related papers, there are always confusing parts, so I put up a questionnaire to clarify this. What I'm confused ...
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In the case that adverbs don’t modify verbs

For example, ‘I run happily.’ I notice that doesn’t mean running is happy, but I run, being happy. However why is it called ‘verb modifier’? Do I misunderstand adverbs?
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Could you teach me how attributive nouns modify nouns?

For example, there’s ‘apple juice.’ Does it mean juice relating to, constituting, or of apple? I mean, is there a contextual meaning without any words between two nouns? I think a literal noun doesn’t ...
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What's the difference between comma + “-ing modifier”, and “-ing” modifier alone?

I am studying English, and I came across this example. In theory, international civil servants at the United Nations are prohibited from continuing to draw salaries from their own governments; in ...
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Still I don't know how to use modifiers properly

For example, a blueberry is blue fruit and if the fruit becomes yellow, is it called 'Yellow blueberry'? That is, 'yellow' is modifying 'blueberry'?
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'Apples, red in two of them and brown in one of them, are rotten'

If apple A and B are red and apple C is brown and they are rotten, then does 'apples, red in two of them and brown in one of them, are rotten' make sense? I mean two red apples and one brown apple are ...
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Can “almost” be used as an adjective? For example “It is an almost failure”

I saw this example sentence in the entry for "almost" in Merriam-Webster dictionary: It is an almost failure. I think it should be: It is almost a failure. Can we use almost to modify a ...
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Do opaque glass make sense?

As you know glass is a transparent (or translucent) substance, however can opaque glass make sense? I don't use a metaphor but I want to talk about a literal sense. For another example, can the orange ...
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The new poor vs the newly poor

a) Who will protect the privacy of the new poor? b) Who will protect the privacy of the newly poor? c) Who will protect the privacy of the very poor? How to correctly modify the word "poor" ...
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What's the problem with “Colonization hundreds of years ago is held accountable for such situation”?

I wrote the following sentence. Colonization hundreds of years ago is held accountable for such situation. I think I have used "hundreds of years ago" as a modifier of "colonization&...
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Should I use a hyphen in premodifiers referring to a time period? [duplicate]

As the heading says: Should I use a hyphen in premodifiers referring to a time period? That is, should I write A five-year stay A 60-credit programme A year-long ordeal or A five year stay A 60 ...
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Is “alone at night” an adjective or an adverb in this sentence?

In this video about the Diagramming of Gerunds and Gerund Phrases that guy is diagramming this sentence: "Walking alone at night is scary." He first categorised 'walking' as a noun since ...
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Is this an example of parallelism?

For dinner we like chicken and stir fried vegetables. Or do I need to say "fried chicken and stir fried vegetables"?
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Modifying nouns without relative pronouns or relative proverbs

Do those sentences below sound natural? 1.She’s got that hair the color of chestnut.(Modified by the objective) 2.I looked in the mirror the size of my two hands.(Modifies by the objective) 3.I saw ...
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“One of the most” VS “Some of the most”

My painstaking grammarphobia is making me pull my hair out trying to figure wrap my head around the usage of "one of the most" and "some of the most". Take for example: A cheetah ...
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modifier placement: Extensive and entertaining . .

Is the following sentence correct and natural? Extensive and entertaining, literary scholars have noted that many of the tales can be thought of as the seeds from which different genres of literature ...
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proposition modifier

When I first read the sentence in blue bracket, I subconsciously regard "with rows of smaller ridges" as a modifier of "spines". Now I realize that it makes more sense to think it ...
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does anyone help me with the grammar structure of “XXX is likely to cause deaths, both proportionally and in absolute numbers.”

I appreciate any help you can provide. Which part is "both proportionally and in absolute numbers" modifying? Naturally, it should be "to cause," but here "to cause" is ...
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Oxford Dictionary - Here “Oxford” is an adjective or noun? [duplicate]

I like to know when noun is used as adjective.
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A word 'Poison' as an adjective

Can the word 'Poison' be used as an adjective? according to two lyrics, it can be Poison heart Poison apple as far as I know adjective for 'Poison' is 'Poisonous', moreover, I couldn't find the ...
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What's the correct order of negated adjectives?

Do adjectives with "not" go before or after the noun they refer to? For example: A not funny guy A guy not funny Which of these is correct?
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modifying a gerund with a counterfactual if-clause

I'd like to know whether it is correct to modify a gerund with a counterfactual if-clause. Does the following sound okay? I like the idea of buying a castle if I were a billionaire.
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One adjective paired with multiple nouns

Perhaps trees feel things in a way totally different from us, but we have no way of finding out about it, because we have no way of discovering the correlations between experience and observable ...
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reduction of an adjective clause that modifies a whole sentence to an adjective phrase

I know there’s a universal agreement that an adjective clause can be reduced to an adjective phrase. However, I’d like to know whether the same rule could apply to the informal use of an adjective ...
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I'm furious with his CONSTANT(LY) laughing at the girl - CONSTANT or CONSTANTLY?

Which one, adverb or adjective, modifies the gerund after its possessive? This is an example to make the above question clear: I'm furious with HIS CONSTANT(LY) laughing at the girl. Which modifier, ...
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Relative clauses vs Adverb in the sentence

After a week of inaction she came back with flying dates 10 days earlier than I wanted and one hotel suggestion: a Holiday Inn — in Paris! His government would seek a date earlier than 2014. In ...
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What does “available” modify in the sentence below?

There are 500 kg of this material available in our stocks. In this sentence does the ''available'' modify '' 500 kg. of this material '' or only ''material''? I thought it modifies ''500 kg. of this ...
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Dangling modifier

Is it correct to write - According to the conditions of my scholarship, after finishing my degree, the University will employ me. The university doesn't finish the degree. So if I write 'after ...
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*Slowing* gaining strength_ What part of speech is 'slowing' in the phrases below?

I thought the authors misused the word 'slowing', because it seems that 'slowly' as an adverb should be used. However, there are multiple examples using slowing + gaining + something(noun). Really ...
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Is “under” considered as a noun modifier to “box”?

He keeps his money box under his bed. Does the adverb "under" modify the head "box"?
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Modifiers in the sentence below

1)Police officers found the footage of the building ten hours ago. 2)Did you see the view of our city a hundred years ago? Police officers found the footage which showed what happened in the ...
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Why use an adjective after a noun?

I heard phrases like "place nice" and "place safe" several times during watching series and movies and each time I was wondering why an adjective stands after a noun while they ...
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How can I attributively express a place's population?

I guess I can't just say, for example, '4,000,000 Los Angeles', i.e. simply put a numeral as a modifier. There's the word 'strong' that can be used for this purpose but, I believe, for different ...
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What should I choose as a modifier: a member of a group or activity?

If I want to construct a phrase meaning "people who teamed up to engage in some specific activity" (in my case, illegal activity), what should I choose as a modifier: a word for the activity or a word ...
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Volunteer/Candidate as Modifiers?

I am translating texts in the field of education, and got confused about two specific words (volunteer and candidate). Can we use these words as modifiers? To illustrate, can we say the following? ...
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Misplaced modifier? Judging by

I have read many sentences with the modifier "judging by..." followed by the subject "it". Such as this example: Judging by his appearance, it is clear that he doesn't comb his hair. The sentence ...
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‘Centuries-old architecture’ or ‘century-old architecture’

I came across the phrase ‘centuries-old architecture‘ in a video provided by BBC learning English. It’s common knowledge that a boy who is 12 years old can be called ‘a 12-year-old boy’ so why don’t ...
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What goes with marks - much or many?

1) How many marks do I need to get in order t get into the college? 2) How much marks do I need to get in order to get into the college? Does the 2nd sentence without the word marks sound better? " ...
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“results' statistics” vs. “results statistics”

How should I write this. There are many results. we remove them them from our results' statistics vs. we remove them from our results statistics vs. we remove them from our result ...
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Adjective or adverb before another adjective

I am aware that adjectives only modify nouns, while adverbs modify everything else (verbs, adjectives and other adverbs). However I'm experiencing some difficulty identifying these two expressions ...
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When is modifier noun in plural?

Why isn't "store" in the plural in the sentence below? More than 7,400 store closures have been announced this year The sentence is from Financial Times.
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What does “so much” modify?

The original: The more Frenchmen killed in North Africa, the less popular the government at home would be, so if foreign cannon fodder was available so much the better. Is it equivalent to? ...