Questions tagged [modifiers]

A modifier is a word (generally an adjective, or a noun used as attribute) that changes the sense of the head noun.

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A fundamental doubt I'd like to clear today

I've asked many people how to know whether an adjective is modifying it or making it specific when the adjective is placed before a noun. Most have told it depends on the context. But one person said ...
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a question about plain language and unnecessary modifiers (not a homework question)

The question below (see the picture) is from Writing in Plain Language course on Linkedin Learning. It's the second last question on the curriculum though. Well, the answer is B (the one in the middle)...
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Hanging on vs To hang on

[Error Correction ] The right wall of my bedroom had nothing ( hanging on,except a clock) . A. except a clock hanging B. to be hanging on,except acloc k C. to hang on,except a clock D. except a ...
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Title case: Which is better ? pre or post-modifier in this case?

Followings are titles for a thesis on Ambrogio Lorenzetti’s Allegory of the Good Government. Ambrogio Lorenzetti depicted two Justices in his picture. Among the four, which one is grammatically best ? ...
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Participle phrase as adjunct or modifier

Consider the below sentence: Revolution broke out in France in 1789, most cogently symbolised then as now by the storming of the Bastille on 14 July. The participle phrase most cogently symbolised ...
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a lot of money (what is a modifier?)

a lot of money 'of money' modifies 'a lot'? or 'a lot of' modifies 'money'? a: an indefinite article which modifies a 'noun' lot: many definitions; one of them: a considerable quantity or extent(a ...
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Attributive nouns: 'trade' and 'trading' with a noun

I am a bit confused when it comes to attributive nouns, i.e. when nouns serve as adjectives. The greatest problem for me is whether I need to use attributive nouns as they are or in their -ing form. ...
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Is "connecting" used correctly in the sentence below?

The ed-modifier and ing-modifier have been very difficult topics of English. Can I use both of them in the following sentence : There have been 2 bridges erected, connecting the lake’s shores. I ...
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V-ing as noun modifier

Just about anyone living in the area at that time is at risk. (From CGEL, 2002, p. 162) I understand it's equivalent to Just about anyone who lived in the area at that time is at risk. I wrote a ...
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as it invests heavily in augmented and virtual reality

What does the boldfaced phrase modify? Meta Platforms, the company formerly known as Facebook, had its worst day ever on the stock market Thursday, after reporting a rare profit decline and stagnant ...
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Does "which" refer to the Chinese buzzwords or the social changes and cultures?

The Chinese buzzwords usually reflect the social changes and cultures, some of which are increasingly popular with the foreign media. I saw this sentence in an exam. What is the antecedent of " ...
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Much vs Many with rank

When We ask someone about their rank, what do we ask them? How many rank did you get in your exam? or How much rank did you get in your exam? I know the above question can also be asked as "...
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Singluar or plural word with two modifiers

I have an effect that is made up of two parts and I have written the following sentence to describe them: We test the importance of the status-enhancing and the status-suppressing components of the ...
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"the biggest liar of all people I have ever known" / "the biggest liar of all the others I have ever known" / "the biggest liar I have ever known"

You are the biggest liar of all people I have ever known. You are the biggest liar of all the others I have ever known. You are the biggest liar I have ever known. Are all of the sentences natural, ...
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An interesting teacher VS an interested student [duplicate]

We know an adjective ending in either -ing or -ed can modify a noun. What is the difference between these two pairs? An interesting teacher An interested student A heartbroken mother ( A ...
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a good night's sleep (which one is modified by "good"?)

a good night's sleep Does good modify night or sleep? The phrase means 'a sound sleep' and wonder which thing is modified by 'good'.
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‘There is a double yolk in the egg.’

‘There is a double yolk in the egg.’ If one of two yolks is red, should I say ‘part of a double yolk’ is red or ‘one of a double yolk’ is red? (Part of a double helix is damaged, etc.)
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When a noun modifies a noun, which word (or words) is a target for an article?

"I work in an office building." Do we determine the article in these cases by looking at the main noun "building" -> "a building"? Or do we determine the article by ...
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An indefinite article with a plural head noun [closed]

I am working on the Reading Test of the Barron's SAT Practice Test 1 - "Indian Country" by Peter Matthiessen, and there is a sentence on line 18 "Termination legislation, which had ...
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what does "predominantly" modify?

In the following sentence, does "predominantly" modify "Afghan" or "Afghan refugees"? A total of 60 visas were granted to predominantly Afghan refugees.
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"Before" as an adverb

I have a question regarding the use of "before" as an adverb. In the following examples, what word or words does "before" modify? As an adverb, it should modify either a verb, an ...
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What does 'else' modify?

I didn't know what else to say. He needed someone else. In these examples, what does 'else' modify? According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, it is an adverb, but I don't understand how. The ...
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Are premodifiers included in the scope of the second NP when two NPs are coordinated elliptically?

In the following examples, where the second NP is elliptical, is the premodifier in the first of the coordinated NPs understood to apply to the second NP as well? A welcome change or addition A ...
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A question about a phrase

In a dictionary, I happen to stumble upon a phrase: bacteria magnified to 1000 times their actual size I think “than” was omitted from the phrase, but I'm not sure. I want to know the structure of ...
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She said, "Never trust a man whose eyes are so close together!"

She said, "Never trust a man whose eyes are so close together!" It means the distance between eyes are short. Does “together” modify “close”?
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“I remember him as an old man with a snowy-white (= pure white) beard”

I remember him as an old man with a snowy-white beard. I want to modify “snowy”. Should I use an adjective (“pure-snowy white beard”) or an adverb (“purely-snowy white beard”)?
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Is "Cold water becomes hot water." logically correct?

Is "Cold water becomes hot water." logically correct? I know it’s a redundant version of "Water becomes hot." I think it’s logically wrong because it’s the same as "Water ...
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“Sky with white clouds” and “white sky”

If there is hot air in summer, we call it “hot summer.” Likewise, if there is white clouds in the sky, can we call it “white sky”? “Forest is filled with green trees, so the forest is green.”
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Choosing a grammatical but better modifier

I have two sentences and I hope anyone can take a look. Having carried out the experiment several times, the scientists finally succeeded in developing a new vaccine. Carrying out the experiment ...
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What is the real meaning of "quite a little number of ..."?

quite a few - phrase used with countable nouns quite a few apples -> many apples quite a little - phrase used with uncountable nouns quite a little money -> much money but what about quite a ...
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Is the bold marked in the below sentence a prepositional phrase? If not what is it?

The budget proposes spending 24.5 percent of G.D.P. over the next decade, up from a baseline of 22.7 percent. In the above sentence, is the part marked bold a prepositional phrase? If not, what is it?...
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Placement of Modifiers

He left the unfinished work. He left the work unfinished. Other examples can be(in present participle) He left the crying child. He left the child crying. What is the difference between 1 and 2 ...
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Conversion of words into definitions

‘Very sharp’ Sharp: having an edge or point that is able to cut or pierce something. Very: in a high degree. What word of the definition of ‘sharp’ is modified by ‘in a high degree’? I think it’s ...
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Can adjectives not only modify a noun but also a noun phrase?

Can adjectives not only modify a noun but also a noun phrase? In the same way, can adverbs not only modify an adjective but also an adjective phrase? Why don’t any grammar books say modifying a phrase?...
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what's the difference between "of" and "being" modifier?

I found a sentence as the following: we have the prerequisites being algorithms for NLP that's not absolutely required but they will be expecting that you have at least some background here. does ...
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Doesn’t an adjective describe a meaning of the noun? [closed]

I don’t understand ‘once-young adult’ is a possible phrase. Adjectives should describe a meaning of a noun, but ‘once-young’ does not qualify the noun because ‘adult’ means an old person.
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Can I get an answer from one logic question?

Although only half of a dish is red, can I call it ‘red dish’? Or only when an entire dish is red, can I call it ‘red dish’?
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Question on omission of "by" and location of modifiers

I am a nonnative graduate student writing science related journals. Whenever I write related papers, there are always confusing parts, so I put up a questionnaire to clarify this. What I'm confused ...
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In the case that adverbs don’t modify verbs

For example, ‘I run happily.’ I notice that doesn’t mean running is happy, but I run, being happy. However why is it called ‘verb modifier’? Do I misunderstand adverbs?
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Could you teach me how attributive nouns modify nouns?

For example, there’s ‘apple juice.’ Does it mean juice relating to, constituting, or of apple? I mean, is there a contextual meaning without any words between two nouns? I think a literal noun doesn’t ...
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What's the difference between comma + "-ing modifier", and "-ing" modifier alone?

I am studying English, and I came across this example. In theory, international civil servants at the United Nations are prohibited from continuing to draw salaries from their own governments; in ...
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Still I don't know how to use modifiers properly

For example, a blueberry is blue fruit and if the fruit becomes yellow, is it called 'Yellow blueberry'? That is, 'yellow' is modifying 'blueberry'?
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'Apples, red in two of them and brown in one of them, are rotten'

If apple A and B are red and apple C is brown and they are rotten, then does 'apples, red in two of them and brown in one of them, are rotten' make sense? I mean two red apples and one brown apple are ...
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Can "almost" be used as an adjective? For example "It is an almost failure"

I saw this example sentence in the entry for "almost" in Merriam-Webster dictionary: It is an almost failure. I think it should be: It is almost a failure. Can we use almost to modify a ...
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Do opaque glass make sense?

As you know glass is a transparent (or translucent) substance, however can opaque glass make sense? I don't use a metaphor but I want to talk about a literal sense. For another example, can the orange ...
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The new poor vs the newly poor

a) Who will protect the privacy of the new poor? b) Who will protect the privacy of the newly poor? c) Who will protect the privacy of the very poor? How to correctly modify the word "poor" ...
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What's the problem with "Colonization hundreds of years ago is held accountable for such situation"?

I wrote the following sentence. Colonization hundreds of years ago is held accountable for such situation. I think I have used "hundreds of years ago" as a modifier of "colonization&...
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Is "alone at night" an adjective or an adverb in this sentence?

In this video about the Diagramming of Gerunds and Gerund Phrases that guy is diagramming this sentence: "Walking alone at night is scary." He first categorised 'walking' as a noun since ...
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Is this an example of parallelism?

For dinner we like chicken and stir fried vegetables. Or do I need to say "fried chicken and stir fried vegetables"?
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Modifying nouns without relative pronouns or relative proverbs

Do those sentences below sound natural? 1.She’s got that hair the color of chestnut.(Modified by the objective) 2.I looked in the mirror the size of my two hands.(Modifies by the objective) 3.I saw ...
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