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Questions tagged [modifiers]

A modifier is a word (generally an adjective, or a noun used as attribute) that changes the sense of the head noun.

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7 views

Volunteer/Candidate as Modifiers?

I am translating texts in the field of education, and got confused about two specific words (volunteer and candidate). Can we use these words as modifiers? To illustrate, can we say the following? ...
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1answer
24 views

Misplaced modifier? Judging by

I have read many sentences with the modifier "judging by..." followed by the subject "it". Such as this example: Judging by his appearance, it is clear that he doesn't comb his hair. The sentence ...
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1answer
28 views

‘Centuries-old architecture’ or ‘century-old architecture’

I came across the phrase ‘centuries-old architecture‘ in a video provided by BBC learning English. It’s common knowledge that a boy who is 12 years old can be called ‘a 12-year-old boy’ so why don’t ...
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1answer
25 views

What goes with marks - much or many?

1) How many marks do I need to get in order t get into the college? 2) How much marks do I need to get in order to get into the college? Does the 2nd sentence without the word marks sound better? " ...
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3answers
40 views

“results' statistics” vs. “results statistics”

How should I write this. There are many results. we remove them them from our results' statistics vs. we remove them from our results statistics vs. we remove them from our result ...
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2answers
55 views

Adjective or adverb before another adjective

I am aware that adjectives only modify nouns, while adverbs modify everything else (verbs, adjectives and other adverbs). However I'm experiencing some difficulty identifying these two expressions ...
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1answer
27 views

When is modifier noun in plural?

Why isn't "store" in the plural in the sentence below? More than 7,400 store closures have been announced this year The sentence is from Financial Times.
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0answers
28 views

What does “so much” modify?

The original: The more Frenchmen killed in North Africa, the less popular the government at home would be, so if foreign cannon fodder was available so much the better. Is it equivalent to? ...
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1answer
41 views

What part of the sentence is modified by “as descents to mental ineptitude”?

But it is more important not to think lies, or to slide into those mechanical and untruthful habits of thought which are so pleasant and so easy as descents to mental ineptitude. Which one below ...
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2answers
57 views

Infinitive as adverbial modifier of purpose

I read this sentence in the Barron's practice exercises book (you should choose the incorrect usage): The understanding (a) electricity (b) depends (c) on a knowledge of atoms and the subatomic ...
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1answer
33 views

Is there a synonym for “increasingly”?

Air transport is increasingly used to export fruit and vegetables to countries where they cannot be grown or are out of season. Is there a synonym for "increasingly"? And, can I use "growingly"? (...
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1answer
45 views

“one” in “one too many”

The phrase "have one too many" means "be slightly drunk." But I am curious about the structure of "one too many." Specifically, what kind of role does "one" play in the phrase? I'd appreciate your ...
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1answer
25 views

Past-participle modifier

They will have to hone their already developed skills in advertising, communication, and marketing migrated to a multimedia, multichannel world increasingly linked together by the Internet. I bolded ...
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1answer
111 views

The Questions which are easy to understand” vs “The easy-to-understand questions”

What do we call the following kind of adjective? I saw a text similar to the following the easy-to-understand questions are so important to make our decisions! I have two questions ...
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1answer
20 views

The structure of the clause “go all round Italy, Austria, Switzerland”

He's going all round Italy, Austria, Switzerland. Would you tell me if my parsing is right or not? "all round" is complement of "go" and "Italy, Austria, Switzerland" are complement of "all round" (...
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1answer
27 views

Understanding modifier

What must google do to keep the competitors AT BAY? I know a prepositional phrase can act as an adverb by modifying the finite verb in the sentence, or act as an adjective by modifying the noun/...
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2answers
30 views

Adjective preposition phrase vs adverb preposition phrase

I'm good Chicago is on the northest tip of Illinois. I'm confuse, in first sentence, "Good" as an adjective, modify subject "I", or linking verb 'IS". If "Good" modify subject "I", then what the ...
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1answer
47 views

“Your age” in the phrase of “a boy your age” modifies “a boy”?

But I'm amazed at how a boy "your age" understood what my job was. I'd think that's a modifier because in the how clause, the subject of understood seems to be "a boy", not "your age". Yet, I'm not ...
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1answer
20 views

Prepositional phrases. Help to sort into the right order

I fill like something is wrong in the phrase bellow. Could someone explain how the phrase in bold should be formed? We talked just as easily as we had in the past, when we would sit in the field ...
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1answer
44 views

what does the adverb “newly” modify in this sentence?

What does the adverb "newly" modify in this sentence? Certain Italians who were newly cognizant of Greek and Roman cultural accomplishments initiated a classical cultural rebirth after a long ...
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1answer
41 views

“deemed + noun”: Is “deemed” an attributive modifier?

A definition on Merriam Webster says: lacking restraint especially : marked by indulgence in things (such as drink or promiscuous sex) deemed vices (source) This definition is a bit confusing, ...
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1answer
43 views

How to use furniture in this sentence?

Is it correct to say: The only furniture that I have is a bed Or I have to put some sort of modifier before it? For example: The only piece of furniture that I have is a bed.
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1answer
55 views

Can a nominal phrase (the size of bullets) modify another noun word (Raindrops) as in “Raindrops the size of bullets”?

Raindrops the size of bullets thundered on the castle windows for days on end; the lake rose, the flowerbeds turned into muddy streams and Hagrid's pumpkins swelled to the size of garden sheds. My ...
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1answer
47 views

Attributive nouns order Vs. Adjectives order

I would like to get the answer for this question from an English native speaker. In my mother language, which is Aramaic, we always use the adjectives and the attributive nouns after the noun being ...
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1answer
14 views

“Crime reducing” Vs. “Crime reduction”

1) Capital punishment could be a crime reduction tool. 2) Capital punishment could be a crime-reducing tool What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences? In other words, can ...
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1answer
75 views

an SAT writing problem

Born in Italy in 1853, Maria Spelterini emigrated to the United States as a young woman and quickly became known for her breathtaking stunts. In 1876, the 23-year-old Spelterini became the only woman ...
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3answers
23 views

Modifier in “People of all ages enjoy swimming”?

Consider the sentence: People of all ages enjoy swimming. Here the solution says that the modifier is "of all ages". I want to understand why is "enjoy" not a modifier in the above sentence.
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55 views

Is the construction “noun- and adverb adjective noun” correct?

Is the construction "noun- and adverb adjective noun" correct? Example: "we found a significant difference between human- and algorithmically generated summaries".
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1answer
82 views

When should noun modifiers be plural and when singular?

As far as I know noun modifiers should be singular. For example: 40 person team - the person is singular even though it's multiple persons However, there are some cases in which a noun modifier will ...
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2k views

What's the difference between “I feel much happy now” and “I feel much happier now”?

What is the grammatical difference between: I feel much happy now. I feel much happier now. What is the difference between them in meaning? Can I say that both sentences are correct?
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1k views

What does “the least possible value” mean?

I was working on a GMAT question: The least possible value for the mean of the numbers of hours of TV reported for the week is [choices]. It a single choice question. But in the phrase "the least ...
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1answer
185 views

why is this answer choice (C) wrong — an SAT problem

Toni Morrison is one of America's outstanding authors, she is known for her critical essays, her novels, and her frequent appearances on television. A. NO CHANGE B. authors; she is known ...
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1answer
39 views

Modifier of the verb try

I have this quiz: __ he tried to cover up the truth, it came out at last. A. No matter what B. Whatever C. No matter how D. However hard The given answer is D but I think ...
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2answers
13k views

“My start day will be …“ or ”My starting date will be …"

Which is correct: My start date will be or My starting date will be I mean to inform a company when I will be starting new job
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3answers
886 views

“A slow moving” vs. “A slowly moving”

which of the following sentences is even more correct? There is a slow moving vehicle ahead. Or there is a slowly moving vehicle ahead. What is the difference between them. To ...
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1answer
544 views

Use of unlike at the beginning of sentence

I corrected the following sentence: Nowadays, if you drive through a forested area, the windscreen of your car will most likely remain almost clean. Unlike 20 years ago, when the windscreen was ...
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2answers
255 views

Is it possible to have two adverbs on both side of verbs, and simultaneously modify or describe the same verb?

The President's speeches are regularly reproduced verbatim in the state-run newspapers. We have two adverbs in this sentence, regularly and verbatim . Is it grammatically acceptable to put two ...
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2answers
40 views

Is this misleading?

My sentence goes like this: Marie and Jackie gather information of possible hiring managers and their company. What I want to convey is that Marie and Jackie gather information of hiring managers ...
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1answer
84 views

The “tech backlash”: type of modifier, comparison with phrase with preposition, meaning?

I've seen the expression tech backlash in the press (for instance NYT, G&M, WEF, VF) and from context I can guess it's about concerns with, or a negative reaction to, shortcomings or impacts from (...
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2answers
60 views

Do all adverbs come before another adverb modify it, or modify the whole sentence?

Keith Tharpe was convicted of the 1990 murder of his sister-in-law, Jacquelyn Freeman, who had been accompanying his estranged wife. After shooting Ms. Freeman with a shotgun, Mr. Tharpe kidnapped his ...
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1answer
25 views

What is this kind of phrase called?

The Source On June 22 last year, a dozen police officers raided his home and arrested him on a charge of plotting to flee to North Korea, a crime punishable by up to seven years in prison. Mr. Kwon ...
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453 views

Articles before modified proper nouns

Nevertheless, Harry was determined to find out more about Riddle, so next day at break, he headed for the trophy room to examine Riddle’s special award, accompanied by an interested Hermione and a ...
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2answers
9k views

Two adverbs in a row with “-ly”

It seems that two adverbs that both modify one verb can't go one after the other without a conjuction in-between: He was speaking slowly unusually. Meaning to say that he was speaking both slowly ...
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1answer
42 views

Thanks to the newly (purchasing/ purchased) printer,

Which answer is correct in this sentence? Thanks to the newly (purchasing/ purchased) printer, we now have fewer problems. I think the answer is purchased because I think it means the printer was ...
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2answers
785 views

Is 'stolen' used as an adjective or noun?

Stolen is past participle of 'steal' but is it used as an adjective or noun! I couldn't find anything on the net. just this: The 71-year-old then allegedly tried to return the stolen items for cash ...
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1answer
272 views

Difference:Too Vs Very [closed]

Grammar often says that very is used with the affirmative form of the adjective; since very is to denote positive connotation. But the following sentence seems to me the paradox of the above rule: ...
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2answers
476 views

“Science books” vs. “Scientific books”

Sometimes I get puzzled whether to use a noun "science" or an adjective "scientific" to modify the following noun. > So, how could you determine, in general,which one is true? > Look at these ...
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131 views

Comparitive degree as a Modifier!

The incident gave hardly an impact upon his vastly greater preoccupations Is comparative used as a modifier? If so, then how it could be used without any comparison shown in the sentence?
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315 views

“Conveniently situated close” vs “conveniently close situated”

The hotel is conveniently situated close to the beach. Does situated describe close in this sentence? And, could we exchange their places with one another, in this way: conveniently close situated?
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1answer
36 views

the devil you know / all the money we have

In the noun phrases "the devil you know" and "all the money we have" what do we call you know and we have nowadays beyond "modifier"?