Questions tagged [modifiers]

A modifier is a word (generally an adjective, or a noun used as attribute) that changes the sense of the head noun.

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Modifying nouns without relative pronouns or relative proverbs

Do those sentences below sound natural? 1.She’s got that hair the color of chestnut.(Modified by the objective) 2.I looked in the mirror the size of my two hands.(Modifies by the objective) 3.I saw ...
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37 views

“One of the most” VS “Some of the most”

My painstaking grammarphobia is making me pull my hair out trying to figure wrap my head around the usage of "one of the most" and "some of the most". Take for example: A cheetah ...
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modifier placement: Extensive and entertaining . .

Is the following sentence correct and natural? Extensive and entertaining, literary scholars have noted that many of the tales can be thought of as the seeds from which different genres of literature ...
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proposition modifier

When I first read the sentence in blue bracket, I subconsciously regard "with rows of smaller ridges" as a modifier of "spines". Now I realize that it makes more sense to think it ...
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does anyone help me with the grammar structure of “XXX is likely to cause deaths, both proportionally and in absolute numbers.”

I appreciate any help you can provide. Which part is "both proportionally and in absolute numbers" modifying? Naturally, it should be "to cause," but here "to cause" is ...
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Oxford Dictionary - Here “Oxford” is an adjective or noun? [duplicate]

I like to know when noun is used as adjective.
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A word 'Poison' as an adjective

Can the word 'Poison' be used as an adjective? according to two lyrics, it can be Poison heart Poison apple as far as I know adjective for 'Poison' is 'Poisonous', moreover, I couldn't find the ...
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What's the correct order of negated adjectives?

Do adjectives with "not" go before or after the noun they refer to? For example: A not funny guy A guy not funny Which of these is correct?
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modifying a gerund with a counterfactual if-clause

I'd like to know whether it is correct to modify a gerund with a counterfactual if-clause. Does the following sound okay? I like the idea of buying a castle if I were a billionaire.
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One adjective paired with multiple nouns

Perhaps trees feel things in a way totally different from us, but we have no way of finding out about it, because we have no way of discovering the correlations between experience and observable ...
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reduction of an adjective clause that modifies a whole sentence to an adjective phrase

I know there’s a universal agreement that an adjective clause can be reduced to an adjective phrase. However, I’d like to know whether the same rule could apply to the informal use of an adjective ...
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I'm furious with his CONSTANT(LY) laughing at the girl - CONSTANT or CONSTANTLY?

Which one, adverb or adjective, modifies the gerund after its possessive? This is an example to make the above question clear: I'm furious with HIS CONSTANT(LY) laughing at the girl. Which modifier, ...
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Relative clauses vs Adverb in the sentence

After a week of inaction she came back with flying dates 10 days earlier than I wanted and one hotel suggestion: a Holiday Inn — in Paris! His government would seek a date earlier than 2014. In ...
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What does “available” modify in the sentence below?

There are 500 kg of this material available in our stocks. In this sentence does the ''available'' modify '' 500 kg. of this material '' or only ''material''? I thought it modifies ''500 kg. of this ...
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Dangling modifier

Is it correct to write - According to the conditions of my scholarship, after finishing my degree, the University will employ me. The university doesn't finish the degree. So if I write 'after ...
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*Slowing* gaining strength_ What part of speech is 'slowing' in the phrases below?

I thought the authors misused the word 'slowing', because it seems that 'slowly' as an adverb should be used. However, there are multiple examples using slowing + gaining + something(noun). Really ...
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Is “under” considered as a noun modifier to “box”?

He keeps his money box under his bed. Does the adverb "under" modify the head "box"?
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Modifiers in the sentence below

1)Police officers found the footage of the building ten hours ago. 2)Did you see the view of our city a hundred years ago? Police officers found the footage which showed what happened in the ...
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Why use an adjective after a noun?

I heard phrases like "place nice" and "place safe" several times during watching series and movies and each time I was wondering why an adjective stands after a noun while they teach that adjectives ...
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How can I attributively express a place's population?

I guess I can't just say, for example, '4,000,000 Los Angeles', i.e. simply put a numeral as a modifier. There's the word 'strong' that can be used for this purpose but, I believe, for different ...
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What should I choose as a modifier: a member of a group or activity?

If I want to construct a phrase meaning "people who teamed up to engage in some specific activity" (in my case, illegal activity), what should I choose as a modifier: a word for the activity or a word ...
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Volunteer/Candidate as Modifiers?

I am translating texts in the field of education, and got confused about two specific words (volunteer and candidate). Can we use these words as modifiers? To illustrate, can we say the following? ...
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Misplaced modifier? Judging by

I have read many sentences with the modifier "judging by..." followed by the subject "it". Such as this example: Judging by his appearance, it is clear that he doesn't comb his hair. The sentence ...
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‘Centuries-old architecture’ or ‘century-old architecture’

I came across the phrase ‘centuries-old architecture‘ in a video provided by BBC learning English. It’s common knowledge that a boy who is 12 years old can be called ‘a 12-year-old boy’ so why don’t ...
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What goes with marks - much or many?

1) How many marks do I need to get in order t get into the college? 2) How much marks do I need to get in order to get into the college? Does the 2nd sentence without the word marks sound better? " ...
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“results' statistics” vs. “results statistics”

How should I write this. There are many results. we remove them them from our results' statistics vs. we remove them from our results statistics vs. we remove them from our result ...
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Adjective or adverb before another adjective

I am aware that adjectives only modify nouns, while adverbs modify everything else (verbs, adjectives and other adverbs). However I'm experiencing some difficulty identifying these two expressions ...
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When is modifier noun in plural?

Why isn't "store" in the plural in the sentence below? More than 7,400 store closures have been announced this year The sentence is from Financial Times.
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What does “so much” modify?

The original: The more Frenchmen killed in North Africa, the less popular the government at home would be, so if foreign cannon fodder was available so much the better. Is it equivalent to? ...
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What part of the sentence is modified by “as descents to mental ineptitude”?

But it is more important not to think lies, or to slide into those mechanical and untruthful habits of thought which are so pleasant and so easy as descents to mental ineptitude. Which one below ...
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Infinitive as adverbial modifier of purpose

I read this sentence in the Barron's practice exercises book (you should choose the incorrect usage): The understanding (a) electricity (b) depends (c) on a knowledge of atoms and the subatomic ...
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Is there a synonym for “increasingly”?

Air transport is increasingly used to export fruit and vegetables to countries where they cannot be grown or are out of season. Is there a synonym for "increasingly"? And, can I use "growingly"? (...
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127 views

“one” in “one too many”

The phrase "have one too many" means "be slightly drunk." But I am curious about the structure of "one too many." Specifically, what kind of role does "one" play in the phrase? I'd appreciate your ...
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99 views

Past-participle modifier

They will have to hone their already developed skills in advertising, communication, and marketing migrated to a multimedia, multichannel world increasingly linked together by the Internet. I bolded ...
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The Questions which are easy to understand” vs “The easy-to-understand questions”

What do we call the following kind of adjective? I saw a text similar to the following the easy-to-understand questions are so important to make our decisions! I have two questions ...
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The structure of the clause “go all round Italy, Austria, Switzerland”

He's going all round Italy, Austria, Switzerland. Would you tell me if my parsing is right or not? "all round" is complement of "go" and "Italy, Austria, Switzerland" are complement of "all round" (...
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Understanding modifier

What must google do to keep the competitors AT BAY? I know a prepositional phrase can act as an adverb by modifying the finite verb in the sentence, or act as an adjective by modifying the noun/...
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Adjective preposition phrase vs adverb preposition phrase

I'm good Chicago is on the northest tip of Illinois. I'm confuse, in first sentence, "Good" as an adjective, modify subject "I", or linking verb 'IS". If "Good" modify subject "I", then what the ...
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“Your age” in the phrase of “a boy your age” modifies “a boy”?

But I'm amazed at how a boy "your age" understood what my job was. I'd think that's a modifier because in the how clause, the subject of understood seems to be "a boy", not "your age". Yet, I'm not ...
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Prepositional phrases. Help to sort into the right order

I fill like something is wrong in the phrase bellow. Could someone explain how the phrase in bold should be formed? We talked just as easily as we had in the past, when we would sit in the field ...
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what does the adverb “newly” modify in this sentence?

What does the adverb "newly" modify in this sentence? Certain Italians who were newly cognizant of Greek and Roman cultural accomplishments initiated a classical cultural rebirth after a long ...
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“deemed + noun”: Is “deemed” an attributive modifier?

A definition on Merriam Webster says: lacking restraint especially : marked by indulgence in things (such as drink or promiscuous sex) deemed vices (source) This definition is a bit confusing, ...
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How to use furniture in this sentence?

Is it correct to say: The only furniture that I have is a bed Or I have to put some sort of modifier before it? For example: The only piece of furniture that I have is a bed.
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Can a nominal phrase (the size of bullets) modify another noun word (Raindrops) as in “Raindrops the size of bullets”?

Raindrops the size of bullets thundered on the castle windows for days on end; the lake rose, the flowerbeds turned into muddy streams and Hagrid's pumpkins swelled to the size of garden sheds. My ...
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Attributive nouns order Vs. Adjectives order

I would like to get the answer for this question from an English native speaker. In my mother language, which is Aramaic, we always use the adjectives and the attributive nouns after the noun being ...
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“Crime reducing” Vs. “Crime reduction”

1) Capital punishment could be a crime reduction tool. 2) Capital punishment could be a crime-reducing tool What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences? In other words, can ...
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191 views

an SAT writing problem

Born in Italy in 1853, Maria Spelterini emigrated to the United States as a young woman and quickly became known for her breathtaking stunts. In 1876, the 23-year-old Spelterini became the only woman ...
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Modifier in “People of all ages enjoy swimming”?

Consider the sentence: People of all ages enjoy swimming. Here the solution says that the modifier is "of all ages". I want to understand why is "enjoy" not a modifier in the above sentence.
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Is the construction “noun- and adverb adjective noun” correct?

Is the construction "noun- and adverb adjective noun" correct? Example: "we found a significant difference between human- and algorithmically generated summaries".
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When should noun modifiers be plural and when singular?

As far as I know noun modifiers should be singular. For example: 40 person team - the person is singular even though it's multiple persons However, there are some cases in which a noun modifier will ...