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"Right" in this context would mean "as I planned/wanted it to", which they are deeming to be "correct" or, as they say, "right". So the person is saying that nothing went as they planned it or as they wanted it to. In some contexts it will mean that they planned a series of happenings, and nothing happened as planned. In other contexts it would mean that a ...


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If you really want to ask the person coughing, you might say: Would/Do you mind if I wear a (face/surgical) mask? But it might be simpler just to look away - if necessary to walk away - and slip on a mask without making a show of it. It might depend on the circumstances. Certainly, in the light of the coronavirus, most of those concerned would simply ...


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There is a small group of verbs that can take an object followed by an adjective: examples include make, get and consider. According to the Cambridge Dictionary, want is one of these words, and it also specifies that the adjective can be a past participle or a present participle: I want these curtains cleaned - past participle I don't want him hanging ...


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It looks like both are correct. One can find relevant results for both cases - by survey and by a survey in Corpus of Global Web-Based English Below are usages of both cases starting with conduct research via .... Conduct research via survey If you search for this phrase in Google, you get several relevant results. For instance, from Annals of Family ...


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A standard turn of phrase (idiomatic usage) for the context here is... With apologies to Mirza Ghalib... (Your poetic efforts, which you admit are feeble compared to one of the acknowledged "poetic greats") This is a common self-deprecating way of admitting that you know your "poetry" isn't particularly good by comparison - but at least you're trying ...


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The second sentence is better. I think the reason "all the time" doesn't work with an instruction is that it would suggest, in a way, that you should keep doing the activity throughout the entire duration, which is still illogical as time is continuous, whereas doing something, even over and over again, represents distinct events. You could also say: ...


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