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16

The two formats are so similar most native speakers woulds barely distinguish them, but to the extent that there is a difference... show initiative - primarily describes a character attribute (you don't need much supervision / guidance, you can make your own decisions) take the initiative - primarily describes an action (you did something when others ...


13

In literal terms, if a certain issue is "on the ballot," it means that when a voter fills out a ballot (i.e., a paper form or computer screen on which a person's vote is recorded), the voter has to mark his/her opinion regarding that issue as part of the process of voting. For example, if the legal drinking age is "on the ballot," it ...


9

The word order I would propose is the following: Maybe I won't get the gold medal, but I will still get at least the silver medal. When used with quantities, "at least" is typically used just before that quantity. E.g. "These bags should be placed into another bag, tied securely and put aside for at least 72 hours before being put in your ...


6

Let's look at two definitions from Macmillan dictionary: UNCOUNTABLE the ability to decide in an independent way what to do and when to do it Example: Mr Hills showed initiative and bravery when dealing with a dangerous situation. the initiative, the opportunity to take action before other people do take the initiative Example: She would have to take ...


4

This may be the most idiomatic position: Maybe I won't get the gold medal, but at least I'll get the silver [medal]. The word "medal" can be left out, since it will be understood from the context.


3

for me, the following sentences sound best: At least I will get a silver medal still. or even better At least I will still get a silver medal.


3

The first thing you need to understand is that 'English' is both a nationality and a language. I'm English, because I was born in England. I'm also British, because England is part of Britain. I speak English, so I'm a native British English speaker. How you use expressions like 'English accent' is all relative. An American might say that I had either an '...


2

I'm sorry, but I did not study that chapter in detail. Also, the moderators of this forum would suggest that you post this question in English Language Learners, as this forum is for serious English questions.


2

In this context "so it sounds" means "apparently". Take a look at this link. Variations of this include: So it appears So it is "So it sounds" is used when the evidence presented has been perceived aurally.


2

All three sentence structures sound fine to me with regards to the placement of "at least", however, the ordering of "will" and "still" sounds unnatural. In all three of your examples, switching these two words will make the sentence more idiomatic. I will at least still get a silver medal. I will still get the silver medal at ...


2

If you are writing a narrative, you should normally use complete sentences. "There is no water in the pump." If you are putting labels on something or making entries in a table, it is not necessary to use full sentences, and "no water" or "no water in pump" is fine.


2

... all the traffic lights seemed to turn red for ten minutes This one feels off. "Turning", in this context means a change in state. The change is quick, especially when compared to the mentioned 10 minutes. The entire interval that is being addressed here consists of two separate/separable components: 1.) a light turns red, 2.) it stays like ...


2

It's the first option – an agent has a preference if he thinks that the desire is good. How do we know it's not the second option? First of all, your 'healthy' doesn't help. 'Good' in that context would mean 'ethically good', 'acting according to correct ethics'. But the text is not about acting ethically – it's not about 'how to be good'. It's about a ...


1

The author is saying that: "To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom" is true, both when trying to find truth in general, and when trying to live lifer in a good way. That is, it says that this rule applies both to "the pursuit of truth" and to "the endeavor after a worthy manner of life." The use of "the endeavor after&...


1

What you've written conveys your meaning. I don't think you need the particular phrase you ask for. I might say it a little differently, perhaps The Effective Altruism movement has had substantial impact even though it is little known. I hope your surrounding text describes how that impact came about, given that the movement is unknown. What was the ...


1

It's a bit of an unusual/clunky phrasing. It might be better understood if written as: Biletsky sidestepped the question, instead reminding the crowd of the importance of voting. i.e. instead of answering the question, he reminded the crowd of the importance of voting.


1

These are two different idioms. To 'take the initiative' means to be opportunistic. For example, if you saw that a job or task needed doing but it was not your direct responsibility, you might take the initiative to do it. To 'show initiative' means to demonstrate that you have the ability to see when a job or task requires action without prompting. You can ...


1

"Ever after" is a poetic way of saying "from then on". It would be perfectly fine to say "nobody saw him from then on", but I'm hesitant to say your example is correct because I've never seen it used with something that didn't happen. It is usually used in a positive sense, that is for things that did happen, for example: They ...


1

A sentence like that is dramatic; it creates tension because the memory hasn't been mentioned yet. So it creates an expectation in the reader that the tension will be resolved somehow. I'd be disappointed if I didn't learn what the memory was by the end of the essay, and why it is valued. "Memory of mine" is a slightly elevated way to say "...


1

I never wear a hat and have never bought one. Though if everyone else started wearing them I suppose I would. I would punctuate this sentence by Old Brixtonian as follows: I never wear a hat and have never bought one. Though, if everyone else started wearing them, I suppose I would. This shows that "though if" is not an idiom, it's just two words ...


1

Can Someone knows his/her business be interpreted as Somone knows his/her stuff? Yes and No. It can be interpreted, but the interpretation is contextual. If it is not an idiomatic expression, it means what the individual words express. Therefore, it can mean anything defined under Business. For example: [5.] You can use business to refer to a particular ...


1

I am aware of the idiom "I'd sooner do sth" A related idiom is "I'd sooner A than B", where A and B are clauses, often in the subjunctive case, where the speaker is ordering their preferences for certain hypothetical situations (rather than certain personal actions, as in "I'd sooner do"). The meaning is "I prefer a ...


1

I don’t think I’ve ever heard “zoom in someone” (nor can I find similar examples online), though it sounds idiomatic enough to me. I would interpret it the same as you, though with a bit of nuance. To me it is a bit closer in meaning to “call in” or “conference in”: the daughters are being brought in or added in. As for what native speakers usually say, it ...


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