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pull off sick wheelies and flips. To pull off something is a phrasal verb. ("Pull off" is used together.) Here it means: to succeed in doing something difficult or unexpected. --- Cambridge Dictionary The word sick is slang used by young people: (slang) very good, excellent: snowboarders doing sick tricks --- Cambridge Dictionary ...


10

It is casual teen slang. "Sick" means "very good" (wikitionary sense 6) "Flip" is some kind of trick in which you rotate in the air. Using "sick" in this way is, perhaps, already a little dated.


6

Everybody is responsible for their own actions. So you cannot blame others for what you did in the past. "Responsible for" is better in this context because it means that everybody is the cause of their own actions. "In charge of" doesn't have this "cause" connotation, but it has the meaning of having the control, or supervision of something. That's why I'...


4

This is less about English than racing terminology. It helps if you understand drag (friction caused by the flow of air around the car) and how drafting (riding closely behind another car) reduces this drag. "First" in this case refers to "First Place". If you draft behind the lead car you can use the temporary reduced drag to slip around at the last ...


4

Generally, off the top of my head is usually used to refer to the first thing that pops into your head. What's the capital of Mauritania?---I don't know off the top of my head, but I could go and look it up. This is a valid thing to say but you could also say: I don't know off the top of my head, but it will come to me. Meaning that it's not ...


3

According to an internet search, "Airship-in-a-bottle" is a special version of a computer software program called "Airship". Airship in a Bottle Use the airship-in-a-bottle.sh script to automatically deploy a demonstration version of Airship. It will attempt to detect the required environment settings and deploy an instance of Airship, including ...


3

[The Train] by Anonymous It's not my job to run the train, The whistle I don't blow. It's not my job to say how far The train's supposed to go. I'm not allowed to pull the brake, Or even ring the bell. But let the damn thing leave the track And see who catches hell! In the above poem, which predates the Internet, the writer is responsible, ...


2

A better (IMO) dictionary definition from Lexico is off the top of one's head PHRASE Without careful thought or investigation. I can't tell you off the top of my head So in the case of the teacher remembering names, you say Our teacher was a really smart person. At the second session, he knew everyone's name by heart. The first phrase is ...


2

"Jumping up to the ceiling" is not an idiomatic expression, but there are a number of others related to being in an elevated position: jump for joy be on cloud nine be flying high be walking on air be over the moon be in heaven be on top of the world and various others. Also for general interest, there's "dancing on the ...


2

It's the way you should pronounce the word (say the word) In this case they are telling you that the second letter sound is EYE.


2

None that are gender specific. "She's too good for him" is possible, but then so is "He's too good for her". There are related expressions, for example: (cast) pearls before swine Generally this is used when you present something valuable to someone who does not (or can not) recognize its worth, but it can be used in this situation to imply that the man ...


1

Tight here would be some variation of meaning 1 in the dictionary you linked to. The arena the game takes place is not large and wide open but instead is smaller and confined, with players located close together.


1

Answered in the comments: "You would not say concerned of either. It's concerned about and anxious about. Using of with either word is unidiomatic at best and ungrammatical at worst. If you insist on the specific phrase anxious of, then the answer here will be that it's wrong. You can change the word that comes before the preposition (such that of becomes ...


1

The rest of this statement is not really expressing the writer's regret. Rather the writer is editorializing, expressing the opinion that the situation described is bad and should be changed. Any of your suggestions work for that, but I would avoid C, because in my view the tone doesn't quite fit. The writer is not so much expressing his or her own emotions, ...


1

In this context, 'trades' could be replaced with 'exchanges' or possibly 'replaces' In other words, the piece is saying that Blades has 'scary dungeons' rather than 'open worlds'. Like many English words, 'trades' has several different meaning according to context.


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