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I know that I have read the term "well" used for exactly this meaning as in "the well of the desk" or "he hid in the well of the desk, out of sight from the door". However, I have not been able to find any online confirmation of this.


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The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by Huddleston et al. (2002) says on page 5: The regional dialects of Standard English in the world today can be divided into two large families with regional and historical affinities. One contains standard educated Southern British English, henceforth abbreviated BrE, together with a variety of related ...


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The first definition of 'dialect' I found in an online dictionary is: "a variety of a language that is distinguished from other varieties of the same language by features of phonology, grammar, and vocabulary, and by its use by a group of speakers who are set off from others geographically or socially", so American English could fit that definition (as could ...


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Outside of formal linguistics study, such terms are not used with any precision. I would simply call it a variety of English, or perhaps a national variety. I would add that one should write "most precise" not "precisest".


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You can say "The tragedy continues to take lives," which means the exact tragedy has happened, but some people involved in it die later in a hospital, for example. Or the tragedy, as such, continues, so it can continue to take lives. When you say "Crowd tragedies continue to take lives all over the world." you mean tragedies in general and not specific ...


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This is quite technical mathematical language, the vertex, or apex is the point at which the curvature is a minimum or a maximum. For a vertical parbola, the vertex occurs at the maximum point. For a car driver, the apex of a turn is the point at which the steering wheel is turned the most. However, it is more common to speak of a "stationary point" (zero ...


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Two terms that may describe what you're looking for are click through rates and conversion rates. Click through rates typically refer to the percentage of people who click on your ad out of all those shown your ad. Conversion rates typically describes the percentage of website visitors who complete whatever website action you want them to--whether that's ...


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Without further context "It will be two degrees today" could mean "+2 degrees Celcius" or "+2 degrees Fahrenheit". You don't need to say "plus" or "above zero". There is nothing wrong with adding a clarifying term, especially if you are comparing with below zero temperatures: After three nights of frost, temperatures will rise and be above zero on ...


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You really need clarification from the one who assigned the work. Unfortunately, the "assignment" can mean both the "details of the work to be done" and the "work that has been done", leaving room for confusion. A writing assignment is easily understood as a request for the action of writing (example: write a paragraph). A reading assignment is easily ...


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Section is, in my experience, the conventional, everyday term for the different physical parts of a newspaper, excluding the magazine, advertising inserts, and other components that are not printed at the same size. Page or pages as Andrew suggests are also in use, as well as feature, but I think of these as parts of the newspaper within a section, rather ...


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The Oxford Dictionaries has pull-out NOUN 1A pull-out section of a magazine or newspaper. don't miss Monday's 8-page Games pull-out. The question and this definition mention the word section NOUN 1.1 A relatively distinct part of a book, newspaper, statute, or other document. the New York Times business section


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Sometimes the additional material takes the form of supplements - these might be a magazine, TV listings, art reviews, etc, each inserted in the newspaper as a kind of mini newspaper (or magazine). (Source here: https://www.inpublishing.co.uk/articles/supplements-1682 )


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One word that can be used is gathered: The cheerleaders gathered to form a big triangle in front of the cheering crowd. As a verb, gathered means: gather (v.) To congregate, or assemble. People gathered round as he began to tell his story. To collect from different places; assemble. To cause to come together; convene. (Sources: ...


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I believe it is in the same in the UK, but in any case in the US these can be referred to as "page" or "pages", depending on the context. Historically, a child might nave said to his father, reading the morning paper over breakfast: Can you turn to the sports page, Dad? I want to see who won last night's match. The term still applies to the online ...


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Phrases such as "Sanctify God's name" and "Sanctify your name" (when addressing God) or "Sanctify your name and keep it holy" and many variants, all in he sense suggested by @choster are very common in the English-language liturgy published for use by Jewish congregations of the Reform and Re-constructionist denominations. The Temple I used to attend ...


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Your second example uses sanctify in a sense which is now obsolete, but which the OED attests from about 1450, 3a. To honour as holy; to ascribe holiness to; = hallow v.1 3. Obsolete. The OED gives an example from Shakespeare's All's Well That Ends Well (1623): Whilst I from farre, His name with zealous feruour sanctifie. Hallow, similarly, can mean ...


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Although there are religious meanings to the word you are asking about, this question is essentially about the difference between a related noun and an adjective. I hope that people can accept this question and answer regardless of their personal religious or secular beliefs. Sanctity (noun) is the state of being holy. Sanctify (verb) is the action of ...


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They are called reported questions with question words. If there is a question with a question word in Direct Speech, (what, where, why, who, when, how) use this question word in Reported Speech. Again there is no auxiliary verb and the word order is like an affirmative sentence Peter: “What time did the train leave?” Peter asked me what time ...


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