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Best return on your money. This one is totally correct. "Return on" is a phrasal verb which means according to Longman Dictionary: The amount of profit that you get from something. That something would be determined if the preposition "from" was added before/after the prepositional phrase (i.e., "on" and its predicate). Your sentence, as a whole, ...


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The correct phrasal verb to be used here is "come across", not "come across with". If you come across difficulties, it means you meet them by chance or accident. The phrasal verb "come across with" is usually used in British informal English. It means to provide something that is needed or expected. For example: He came across with more information.


2

Because it is an idiom, and we do not "adapt" idioms. If I am not wrong, more than meets the eye is the shorter form of more than what meets the eye Since "what" has the value of a singular, it requires a verb in singular, even if it ("what") is missing.


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Carry out means to bring to a successful issue, complete or accomplish, or to continue to an end or stopping point (Merriam-Webster). Example: He carried out the task efficiently and cheerfully. You can't say: Do you still carry out your test? ...because "carry out" refers to perform and complete, not only to perform.


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Yes, if you carry out a task, you do/perform the task: I left her to carry out the task of correcting the errors. You can also carry out a test: Rigorous safety tests are being carried out (= conducted/performed/run) on the new jet.


4

Actually "drew up to" is the more correct form for this meaning. This usage goes back to the days of horse-drawn carriages, when a carriage would draw up to a specified spot such as a door way or entry way. This use ultimately derives from the way in which a horse would draw the vehicle. "Draw up at" has an essentially identical meaning. "Draw up" with ...


4

The two sentences do not mean exactly the same thing, no. Those positional prepositions mean two different things; you get "out of" something if you are no longer inside of it, and you are "away from" something if you are no longer near to it. In the sense of helping someone "get away" (or make a "getaway") it still means distance. If the prisoners dug a ...


1

The difference between "lift" and "carry" is that "carry" implies you travelled with the item after you lifted it. For example, you can stand on the spot and "lift weights", but if you are "carrying a weight" it means you are walking around with it. "Lift up" idiomatically means to pick something up. Some might say this is a tautology, but "lift down" ...


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Native speakers looking for this kind of thing use a thesaurus (wikipedia), most often one descended from Roget's 1805 work. An online version of that gives separate 10 Irrelation: Adj. disrelated, disconnected, dissociated, detached, removed, separated, separate, segregate, apart, independent, independent. 15 Difference: Vb. separate, sever,...


2

You're so right that translation is far more than simply substituting words. To translate well from one language to another you need to have a reasonable idiomatic understanding of both. My favourite example of how you can't translate with a bilingual dictionary alone is that if you were asked to translate the German term "schraube and mutter" into English ...


3

This is obviously where experience and knowledge starts to really help! One practical way that even native speakers are advised to use to get that knowledge is a decent thesaurus, and then under synonyms or antonyms there should be some useful alternatives - including phrasal verbs. Here is thesaurus.com I have put in 'separate' already. Notice the tabs ...


1

without clarifying what you are scooping up and just mentioning from what container you are scooping up If you want to relay this exact sentiment, then your sentence would not be correct. While grammatical, it doesn't relay the meaning that you want: ✘ She scooped up an ice cream box. This says that she either picked up the ice cream box itself, or she ...


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Literally, the term "scoop up" means "to use a scoop (like a small, deep shovel) to collect something that is difficult to collect by hand, such as a pile of dirt, or small rocks, or anything granular. You can also scoop up something with your hands, in an action like using a scoop: The child flung her arms around him as he knelt to scoop her up. ...


0

The specific phrase "slipped up on" means "made a mistake about" or "made a mistake in regard to. The phrase folloing "on" indicates exactly what the mistake concerned. In this use, on does not imply "during" or 'while" as it can in other constructions. He slipped up on just one detail. One detail was incorrect, althoguh everythign else was right. Often ...


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These aren't really phrasal verbs. "at" refers to being in or near a location or state. "to" refers to a destination. If you are working, you are at work. If you are returning from a vacation with work as your destination, you are going back to work. Both are correct, and both are the standard, non-phrasal meaning of the prepositions, and they follow "back", ...


2

There are some subtle differences between the two sentences This research is devoted to investigating. I wanted to investigate. These differences are caused by the verb that is used. The verb "devoted" is a part of a verb-preposition combination with the preposition "to". In the first sentence, "investigating" is a gerund noun that is used as the ...


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In your example, "This research was devoted to investigating the performance," that "to" is not part of an infinitive. It's a preposition associated with "devoted". "Devoted to" is an expression meaning "dedicated to", "used for", "occupied with", or "spent on". The infinitive form of "investigate" is "to investigate", just like other verbs. In your ...


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You can say both, and you don't have to be too explicit about the place: it's the place where the people are. The plant manager showed investors around the plant The plant manager welcomed the investors to the plant and showed them around Welcome. Let me show you around.


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"Serve out" is incorrect; it's not a phrasal verb - you should just use "serve." "They have started dishing out the food" or "They have started serving the food." "Please dish me out a plate" or "Please serve me a plate." Whilst very similar in meaning, "dish out" is more informal, and has a sense of sharing something equally to multiple people. You would ...


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1- John began to talk but she guessed at his intention and interrupted him. 2- John began to talk but she guessed his intention and interrupted him. Number one does not suggest anything about whether the guess was correct or not. Number two strongly suggests that her guess was correct. 3- There are no photographs of him, so we can only guess at what he ...


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Some English verbs can take "at" plus their usual object. This "at" roughly means that it is not possible to observe that anything was achieved by the action. Some examples: The puppy is pulling the blanket could mean the blanket is moving along with the puppy The puppy is pulling at the blanket could mean the puppy is not managing to get the blanket to ...


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