Hot answers tagged

75

It's supposed to be funny. It implies I can't deal with people today. I personally didn't find it funny because this structure I can't [noun] seems cliche to me. It is supposed to invoke something like this It's akin to I can't even if you are familiar with that expression. I felt like I should probably note that the structure (using nouns ...


58

I am going to write this answer from a sociolinguistic perspective, because there is a lot at stake that can't be explained with a yes/no answer. Nonetheless we shall still make an attempt at giving a simple answer to your title question. Yes "cop" is considered slang. No, it is not derogatory. For a term to be considered derogatory, it has to ...


53

No. Referring to a forty-nine-year-old man as a "49er" is not idiomatic in either American or British usage. The more idiomatic expression would be "49-year-old," as in: I was talking to a 49-year-old. "49er" or "forty-niner" is an English word, but it has nothing to do with age. It refers to one of a wave of gold prospectors who traveled to the American ...


52

My first thought was to give someone props: give props to (one) To praise one and show them respect. Thank you, but I have to give props to Jeanne, who organized this entire event for us. (TFD) props noun, ( usually used with a singular verb) Slang. proper or due respect or recognition; credit: I give him props for putting up with ...


48

I think the closest expression with the same meaning and very similar connotations would be the French expression: C'est la vie. meaning That's life. You can use the French phrase as is because it is famous enough to be understood in any English speaking country. Certainly there are some more possibilities to say it in a polite way as to avoid ...


45

I believe that you are referring to the idiomatic meanings. nailed it to complete a task successfully or get something right Example. A: Oh, you didn't burn the cake this time. B: Yep, nailed it! Nail down can have a similar meaning. nail down : to make (something, such as a victory) certain to happen <They need to score ...


44

There is nothing wrong with “cool” as an informal sign of approval. I disagree with the Urban Dictionary editor who said that it’s ugly. In fact, as far as informal words go, “cool” is quite a venerable example, since it has been in use since as early as the 1960s I suspect. The only reason I’d use “nive” — which I hadn’t heard of until now — would be if I ...


43

To ship two people or characters, means wanting to see them in a (romantic) relationship. This is usually something fans of a show or other popular medium do.


41

While these are three unrelated words, they share some characteristics: all are produced by modifying existing words in particular ways that are fairly standard. You're right that a documenter would be one who documents; in general, adding "-r" or "-er" to a verb very often means someone who often does that verb. Your automated spell-checker doesn't have ...


40

You have it right; "smoke" can be used to mean "win" (or maybe even, "win easily," or "win decisively"). When talking about lopsided contests, frequently-used slang verbs fall into a few different categories. For example, there's the word beat, along with its synonyms (such as drub, thrash, whip, and trounce – all of ...


39

IMO - in my opinion IMHO - in my honest/humble opinion Both of these are very well known internet acronyms, and have been used for many years. Both expressions are more or less interchangeable, and in my humble opinion is not by itself sarcastic - it should be taken as being genuine sign of humility, unless something else in the sentence indicates ...


37

To smoke someone originally meant (and still does mean) to shoot them to death with a gun. The reference was to the smoke coming from the weapon's muzzle. This colorful term has come to mean "defeat soundly, trounce".


35

The problem you ran into is that idioms are often fixed grammatically—you have to use them in certain grammatical contexts for them to mean the same thing. When you use "hammered" as an adjective, it can mean drunk, and usually doesn't mean attacked: He is hammered. He was so hammered. It made him hammered. We got him hammered. When you use "...


33

In the UK, you can still use the term bitch without embarrassment, providing that the context is clear: Our bitch, Sally, has just had pups. However, you might want to think twice before referring to someone else's dog as a "bitch". I have the feeling that the term is falling out of use, partly because most dogs are given names and so it can easily be ...


32

Yes, in English, you can say: x runs as smoothly as a Swiss watch. This can be checked by googling to see sites where the expression occurs. There are, of course, many other expressions in English for this meaning.


31

I'm not sure there's a direct female equivalent, but there's a gender-neutral expression with a similar meaning and level of vulgarity: Get off my ass! That being said, I think it's much more common to hear a female speaker use the original "... breaking my balls," then for her to adapt it for female anatomy. I know plenty of women who use the expression ...


30

(vulgar slang alert) A preachy know it all under a skin of designer clothing. Criticizes everything she considers "out of style" or "tacky". (from the Urban Dictionary) As J.R. says: use with caution.


29

In this sense, to ship two persons means to imagine that they are in a romantic relationship, or to desire that they are in a relationship. This normally applies to characters in a work of fiction (movie, novel, etc.), it would be unusual (but not impossible) to apply it to real people. The term originates from fandom. It was popularized in the Internet era,...


28

The difference as far as I am concerned is that while the two words may have an essentially identical dictionary definition, hooker is never used as a direct insult; it is actually less pejorative and more literally descriptive. If I catch my fiancee sleeping with my best friend, I would never say "You hooker! How dare you!", but only "You whore! How dare ...


28

Both "dude" and "man" are INFORMAL. Whether or not they are disrespectful depends on whether you are expected to have a formal or informal relationship with the person you are addressing. If you have a familiar relationship already, calling them either term reinforces that familiarity. If I say to my friend "Check this out, man!" the subtext of the ...


26

I think in this context "a rip" is simply a euphemism, a more socially acceptable version of a stronger swear word. One can, after all, give or not give: -a damn -a darn -a good goddamn -a fuck (possibly even a flying fuck) -a shit (or two shits) -a hoot (or even a hoot in hell) -a tinker's damn/dam -a pair of dingo's kidneys or many, many other things. ...


25

"Fuckin'" here is an intensifier, and it modifies "far". The meaning is the same as "very", with the added connotation of expressing contempt for social propriety, since "fuckin'" is vulgar. Since "far" is an adjective, "fuckin'" is an adverb, if it matters. (That's not a "word class", though, that's a part of speech: the role played by the word in a ...


25

In English, there are many ways to express that something works perfectly fine, here are some (these pertain to situations when something happens without any problems at all): to go like clockwork [verb phrase] - if something you have arranged such as an event or journey goes like clockwork, it happens in exactly the way that was planned, with no problems ...


23

Although lmao is used as LMAO, which stands for laughing my ass off, it is often used as a general substitute for "ha ha ha". And, "ha ha ha" is not always a genuine, hearty laugh. As for your example, it should probably be written or read with a comma: I am involved with way too many languages and I am a mess, lmao. In casual, informal speech, "I am a ...


23

The pairing of "basically literally" is very colloquial/informal and skews young. I hear it moderately frequently, mostly when people are recounting stories about personal interactions. It means "I am emphatic that my description conveys an accurate feeling of a moment/interaction, but it isn't literally true--I am exaggerating or simplifying for story ...


22

It's a modification of the word ridiculous, using donk /dɑŋk/ to replace dic /dɪk/: Absolutely ridiculous! As you might expect, redonkulous sounds a bit silly. It's considered slang, and only certain people use the altered word. Although it means "ridiculous", it's non-standard and markedly informal. I haven't seen the movie in question, but it ...


21

A polite and reassuring way: "It could have been worse"


20

I looked up some slang dictionaries: pop a chubby, chubby. It was news to me that this word had this slang meaning: to have an erection. So, quite logically, "unchubby" means "without an erection". The original sentence could be transformed into: If you are gay, why didn't you have an erection in the shower? A gay person might have an erection from ...


20

It's hard to come up with a word that works all the time, because much of this depends on your perspective. Some might call this person shallow. They think this person pays too much money for a name brand – particularly if they don't have a lot of disposable income. They might view this person as a sucker for a slick advertising campaign, and as a person ...


20

If software is тормоз because too many poorly implemented features have been added, then it is "bloated." This bloating might be the result of feature creep, as many 'small' features get added on one after another. Software that has suffered from this problem ends up being called bloatware. If it is тормоз because it is poorly written, and needs to be re-...


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