Questions tagged [british-english]

for questions specifically related to the English language as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.

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11 views

correct usage/sentence structure

The terrorists had used their influence — fear— to keep the women as prisoners. The power of believing in the myth (fear) kept its spirit alive. How should these types of examples be punctuated? ...
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25 views

Struggling understanding IELTS reading comprehension answer key

I need some help with explaining this IELTS reading exercise. The question from the exercise is: Rocket as war weapons were first invented or used by ________? The options are: a. The Chinese b. ...
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1answer
23 views

Correct usage with as

He was late for work, as although he needed the money, he didn't like the job. He was late for work. As although he needed the money, he didn't like the job. Are both of these sentences correct? ...
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1answer
21 views

There will not be after school class tomorrow, will be?

There will not be after school class tomorrow, will be ? Is this question grammatically correct ?
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1answer
35 views

Are you ready for Sports Day?

I wonder why the book wrote: Are you ready for Sports Day? (=the Sports Day) Why there is no article 'the' preceding the word Sports since it is a Proper Noun?
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1answer
17 views

A question regarding: Here is some medicine

My reference book gives me an example as follows: Here is some medicine. To me, it does not make sense since some implies things more than one; thus, should medicine becomes medicines? Having ...
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1answer
21 views

What loud thunder! or What a loud thunder!

My reference book gives me an example as follows: What loud thunder! Should it be written as: What a loud thunder!
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1answer
24 views

Vegetable or vegetables?

The book I'm using writes vegetable in a plural form. I don't think this is correct. Do you like strawberries or lettuce? No. I like neither fruit or vegetables. Should it be written as: ...
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1answer
28 views

The missing “from” in British English— is it really correct?

Typical American construction: "I drew my pistol and stopped the intruder from attacking me." Typical British construction: "I drew my pistol and stopped the intruder attacking me." Is the ...
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2answers
85 views

“It's just rammed up again”

I heard in a British show this line: We cleared this place out before, but it's just rammed up again. (source) The subtitles on Netflix also give "rammed up", but this phrase doesn't make sense to ...
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0answers
12 views

commas with names

The talented local runner and medal winner, Joanne Smith, has won gold in the local race for charity. The daughter of a local councilor, runner Joanne Smith, has won gold in the local race for ...
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1answer
16 views

Is 'I can't imagine what would that be like' a correct sentence?

I don't like literary theory, I can't imagine what would that be like.. That's my own sentence, but I've got no idea how to correct this.
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28 views

“high school” in UK/BrE?

I was under the impression, that high school is typical AmE while in UK secondary school was used. However, I was confronted that in British English high school is also used, and I was provided with ...
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1answer
42 views

Run 2 runs, run 2 (can “runs” be dropped in colloquial language) [cricket]

I had a question related to Cricket. Colloquially, where the context's obvious, can "runs" be dropped to avoid duplication? The batsman ran two runs. But can it be (in a obvious context) The ...
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1answer
13 views

You have to choose an hour that isn't already taken by someone

I always have problem using the word already, or simply have trouble with tenses; in the first place, is the sentence in the question correct? secondly, when should we use already, can we use it in ...
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1answer
19 views

timeout vs. time-out vs. time out in British English

I have a term called time out which refers to the maximum amount of time the program will wait for a response, after which it will close the connection. I do not know how to spell it. There is the ...
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1answer
36 views

what are the words used to describe pronunciations called?

Following are some examples of words that describe the pronunciation of other words. What are these descriptive words called? I tried using search but it didn't help. hipster - hip.stuh say -...
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3answers
55 views

Use of “shall” with third person pronoun in British English

Is this still common in British English to use the modal 'shall' with a third person pronoun? If so, what is the difference between the following? He shall repent. He should repent.
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1answer
20 views

Order of two prepositional phrases

Which of these would be better: I came here from England for my education or: I came here for my education from England
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2answers
51 views

Pronunciation of the prefix de- (UK / NA)

Example words: Decode Demilitarize Are given in Wiktionary with a short i sound "Dick-oh-d" "Dim-ill-it-ugh-rise" But I can‘t find anything in other dictionaries or examples on Youtube to back this ...
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1answer
15 views

What does “Something has to go” mean

Hello to all community members. I am preparing for the IELTS listening and rehearsing the cambridge books IELTS listening tests. I marked one question wrong and when i checked the typescript and ...
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1answer
33 views

correct usage with although/therefore

but cannot be used in the same way at although/though. We use but to connect items which are the same grammatical type. https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/conjunction The ...
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1answer
39 views

Difference between mean and tight

I'm trying to guess if an English speaker says mean or tight when you are talking about a person who don't like to spend their own money. Do you use different words depending on the friendship with ...
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2answers
285 views

If current results hold, Man City would win PL title

The line under the scoreboard says If current results hold, Man City would win PL title. I am totally confused about why would is there. It describes a particular condition (winning the game) and ...
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0answers
15 views

About correct preposition

It appears from/ through the study that the author is inspired by/with/from historians of Ghazna period. tell me the correct preposition to be used here.
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1answer
28 views

Hazard SEALS Europa League final spot

Chelsea 1-1 Frankfurt: Hazard seals Europa League final spot after Kepa penalty heroics The title is confusing. How can one seal the spot in a competition? What does to seal mean here? Is it to cover,...
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1answer
53 views

“WHAT do you want to be?” vs “WHO do you want to be?”

I came across this What do you want to be when you grow up? [...] Are you right now who you want to be? and the first sentence sounds weird to my English learner's ear. Specifically, I am ...
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2answers
46 views

How do you call “a bicycle pump” informally?

I said I borrowed a bicycle pump yesterday. and it bothers me because I think there should be nicer options (less formal, more conversational). Is there any colloquial alternative to "a bicycle ...
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1answer
19 views

Understanding Last lot & New lot

What does "Under the last lot. Under the new lot" mean in this passage: Paul: Have you ever seen me cry? Do I look like a man who cries? Has there ever been a day … ? Christ, we’ve known each ...
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2answers
39 views

Does “the care of A” mean that “someone looks after A” or “A looks after someone”?

They shared the care of the children. This is a straightforward sentence telling us that "they looked after the children". The study showed a deep fear among the elderly of being abandoned to ...
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1answer
22 views

correct usage with phrases

Why doesn't just a sense work as the subject in the following sentence? Why does it need in a sense? A sense we were witnessing someone pushing boundaries and defying conventions. You could have: ...
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2answers
44 views

Is there a polite and natural way to welcome the stranger you've already met today?

Is there a polite and natural way to welcome the stranger you've already met today? A usual greeting seems inappropriate since you've already seen the person. Even if it was a brief encounter (in a ...
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4answers
555 views

Fizzy, soft, pop and still drinks

I was curious what people call a carbonated (with gas) and non-carbonated (gas-free) beverages / drinks in English speaking regions around the world. I need two fixed terms in everyday English which ...
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4answers
62 views

An equivalent for “Carrying coal to Newcastle” widespread in both AmE and BrE

What is the Americans equivalent for the following proverbial sayng which means: "to supply something to a place or person that already has a lot of that particular thing": Carrying coal to ...
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16answers
7k views

What's the polite way to say “I need to urinate”?

What's the polite way in the UK to say "I need to urinate" (both for men and for women)? Or maybe there's no problem with that sentence? N.b. I'm asking about situations in which I know where it's ...
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1answer
30 views

usage with with is in this example

A film scene is made all the more powerful by its score. Can we say something is made powerful? Should it be something like: brought to life by its powerful score.
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2answers
16 views

What should I use here?

All I see is a dead crowd and people on their phones All I see are a dead crowd and people on their phones Which one is grammatically correct?
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2answers
73 views

To study english with Sherlock Holmes movie is fine?

I am studying english with movies Notting Hill and Sherlock Holmes, but the Sherlock Holmes movie (Robert John Downey Jr) is based in 100 years ago. Do you think it is good to study?
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1answer
147 views

Does anyone know how to distinguish between (1) [ Subject(plural) + are + Object(plural) ] and (2) [ Subject(plural) + are + a/an Object(singular) ]?

For example: Computers are important research tools Computers are an important research tool. Does anyone know how to distinguish between (1) and (2)?
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1answer
600 views

Do British people often use the word lightning conductor?

Do British people use the word lightning conductor more frequently than a lightning rod?
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1answer
14 views

Understanding a line through a passage

What this line means: That’s what I always you see? (Edward canes Anna once) Edward: One. That’s what I always you see? I think it’s fairer you see to count aloud. So that the boy knows ...
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1answer
48 views

I was having a bath with my glasses wore/wearing?

I want say a sentence like: I was having a bath with my glasses wore/wearing I've definitely come cross similar structure like this, with my stuff + past simple(or perhaps past participle). Hopefully ...
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0answers
22 views

“Cause unwholesome inspiration and impact on viewers”

So I have this sentence, and I don't know if you can say "cause" or if I should replace it with another word. Thank you, thegirlinneedofhelp
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2answers
48 views

What is the basic difference between these two?

1) I have seen everything today 2) I saw everything today How is the first line different from the 2nd please explain?
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1answer
39 views

“public transport” vs. “public transportation”

Buses are the main form of public transportation Buses are the main form of public transport Which one is correct?
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1answer
29 views

It is so lovely a day

I know "such a lovely day" is definitely correct, but what do you think of "it's so lovely a day"? Is it okay as well? This part of an exercise I did in FCE use of English, 'it's so lovely day' is ...
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1answer
37 views

Correct usage with conjunctions

The performer died after falling ill on stage. This was thought by the audience to be a part of the act, until emergency services were called in, the audience was evacuated, and he was declared dead ...
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1answer
16 views

understanding words in a passage about Caning

this conversation is about caning, but I have a problem with the meaning of this line: "Take this firmly in both hands and bend and you could snap it in two." the context is about "snap" the ...
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2answers
32 views

type of usage with finite clauses

I heard this song played on the radio. I heard this song (finite clause) So 'I heard this song' feels like it requires more information alone, but you could say it in speech or: I heard this song....
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1answer
24 views

Numerals: how to read and understand [closed]

Please, help me to puzzle it out:) I've read the sentense in the text about school: "There are about one 600 pupils". The author writes how large the school is. I understand the meaning of the phrase, ...