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Questions tagged [british-english]

for questions specifically related to the English language as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.

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How would you translate "le rendez-vous du tout Paris" in English?

This is a "famous" French expression and to be honest, I thought Anglophone speakers used it too, I was almost sure I'd heard it before. Some research online and no results. Do you know if ...
Mathilde Da Silva's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
116 views

correct usage of "that"

Is this sentence using "that" correctly? Is it correct? It's a story about the brotherhood of people, that we are all children of the same land. Can a conjunction be dropped in these types ...
bluebell1's user avatar
  • 567
3 votes
10 answers
3k views

What would you call the ground floor if you were in a country where it is the first floor?

I live in a country where we call the floor of a building at the ground level the 1st floor, the next one - the 2nd floor and so on. We have the same numeration in our lifts and these numbers are ...
Kate's user avatar
  • 147
-1 votes
0 answers
21 views

Question about reduce sounds in phrase "is in the" [closed]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XY9tbs-usbA 0:22: Does he link "m" in the word "them" to "a" in the word "all"? 0:28: Does she link "n" in the word &...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
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Could I use "that" if I merely have one bike?

On https://www.grammarly.com/blog/which-vs-that/, it says In a restrictive clause, use that. In a nonrestrictive clause, use which. It shows two examples. My bike that has a broken seat is in the ...
ZhangLiao's user avatar
10 votes
3 answers
2k views

Can I completely omit "of" when speaking quickly?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_der_x5Zxmc At 3:37 of this video the man says, as far as I'm concerned, "For portions of that first half we sort of dominated them". I've slowed the audio ...
musialmi's user avatar
  • 527
0 votes
2 answers
84 views

Does British English affirm a negative question with yes?

Suppose I was asked this negative question: You are not a student, are you? and I'm not a student. Years ago I read in a book that in American English the answer would be No, I'm not a student But ...
Raestloz's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
56 views

I slipped/have slipped on... I think I broke/have broken my

The following is from a movie called "Home Abduction" (here's a link to that moment on YouTube): Woman #2 goes upstairs. Woman #1 is waiting for her downstairs. Woman #1 hears woman #2 ...
prof1589's user avatar
  • 155
2 votes
1 answer
64 views

Is Doug pronounced dug or door-g?

I remember many years ago when I was in Durham, UK, people pronounce the name Doug as door-g. However, I look up the dictionary and Oxford dict online and many other sources, they clearly say that ...
Chenxi's user avatar
  • 21
8 votes
2 answers
3k views

Why English IPA is so different across its definitions?

I'm trying to create a website to help my partner learn phonetics. She is taking a class as part of her English degree. The issue is that I do not understand how phonetic translation works and ...
tteixeira's user avatar
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0 answers
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Am I expected to add more or further thoughts following indeed?

Is it proper to reply “Indeed!” to agree with someone on some opinion? Am I expected to add more or further thoughts following indeed? (I remember seeing such advice somewhere, and can't find it. But ...
Tim's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
122 views

What should a room in a hospital where nurses dress wounds of patients be called?

Bing's dictionary (which in turn is based on some Oxford dictionary) says that verb dress has this sense: clean, treat, or apply a dressing to (a wound): "she washed the wound and dressed it ...
Tim's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
80 views

What's this linguistic, phonetic or phonologic phenomenon called?

I was enjoying the relaxing vibes that the hotel provided. When Americans say the above sentence, do they sometimes say "vibes that" as "vibesat"? Does it also happen in other ...
Tim's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
68 views

What are you? or Who are you?- questions about jobs [duplicate]

Some years ago students in Russia were taught to use only "What are you?"-question when asking about jobs or professions. But some days ago I came across both questions - "What is this?&...
Olga's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
97 views

I found out that a new restaurant has opened

On the way home from work, Sarah noticed a new restaurant a couple of blocks from her house. When she came home, she said to her husband: 1. I found out that a new restaurant has opened in our ...
prof1589's user avatar
  • 155
0 votes
4 answers
32 views

Placement of a relative pronoun

Please consider the following sentence: Ada Lovelace is the first computer programmer in the world who wrote the code for analytical engine. Is the placement of the relative pronoun "who" ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
89 views

Are both verb forms acceptable? "There is/are marks all over it."

a) There are marks all over it. b) There is marks all over it. “Is” vs. “Are”—Correct Usage Can is be switched with are here or it is ungrammatical to do so? I may be inclined to say in speech: there ...
bluebell1's user avatar
  • 567
1 vote
1 answer
78 views

Following the present perfect (I've cooked) with the simple past (I didn't make)

John gets up later than his wife does because his work day starts later than his wife's. His wife always cooks him breakfast before leaving for work. This time she's cooked him some mashed potato and ...
prof1589's user avatar
  • 155
-2 votes
1 answer
26 views

Articles before the nouns in specific cases

Pls kindly explain why we use "a" article in the sentences like "He has a personal fortune of 1 billion", "a temperature of around 19 degrees"etc
user avatar
1 vote
6 answers
529 views

What is the difference between American and British English on "garden" and "yard"?

(Source: https://www.eyre-design.co.uk/garden-design/back-gardens/) After I have done my research, this is what I understand. Have a look at the picture above. British will say "front/back yard&...
Tom's user avatar
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6 votes
3 answers
2k views

Differences in Usage: 'Cellphone' vs. 'Mobile Phone' in English

I've often come across two terms that seem to refer to the same device but are used differently: "cellphone" and "mobile phone." I'm curious about the differences in the usage of ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
57 views

Is "tartar" more common than "scale" in dentistry?

According to my study, some British people say "a buildup of scale on my teeth" and both British and American people say "a buildup of tartar on my teeth". The British also say &...
Tom's user avatar
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-5 votes
2 answers
74 views

Pleonasm and formal logic [closed]

Would such statements as 'That is quite true' or 'That is very true' be taken as non-pleonastic, acceptable ways of saying by educated people in the UK? (In formal logic, true or false are boolean ...
Brice C.'s user avatar
  • 343
0 votes
3 answers
85 views

In British English, can I use "be" in the past/present/future continuous tenses, like in "you are being selfish"? [closed]

According to the Oxford dictionary, be is not used in the Past /Present /Future Continuous tenses, so in terms of standard British grammar I cannot say "You are being selfish". According to ...
Jess3032's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
29 views

Slowed meaning negative or just in this sentences

In this paragraph: For the €362bn personal luxury goods sector, 2023 may go down as the year that the post-Covid bubble finally burst. Despite the reopening of China at the start of the year, demand ...
mj125's user avatar
  • 129
10 votes
6 answers
7k views

What is the British version of "jaywalk"?

American people say jaywalk: to cross a street carelessly or at an illegal or dangerous place The police officer warned us not to jaywalk It seems British people don't say "jaywalk". Do we ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
28 views

phrase as alternative to "I'm scared of being here"?

I want to know if I could strike a more formal tone as an alternative to "I'm scared of being here" like: 1 - "I'm in fear to be here" or "I'm feared to be here" are ...
Giliarda Freitas's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
139 views

"Within 7 working days upon arrival" vs. "of your arrival date"

Two questions Is there any difference between the sentence "within 7 working days upon arrival" and "within 7 working of your arrival date"? How do we count these 7 working days? ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
89 views

Present perfect for three consecutive events

John, Peter and Sarah are at a ski resort. John loses his balance and falls down. He then tries to get up, but he can't, so Sarah and Peter call for an ambulance. When it arrives, the doctor says John'...
prof1589's user avatar
  • 155
2 votes
2 answers
202 views

Do we say "put" a rental bike shop?

I can't come up with anything better than to set up a (specialist) shop in an area. Imagine a park up in the mountains where kids could do MTB (mountain biking?) a place that is accessible but lacking ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.3k
0 votes
2 answers
62 views

May I know the meaning of *Take some punches*? [closed]

May I know the meaning of Take some punches
user181258's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
196 views

Present perfect vs. simple past for a sequence of actions (British English)

John is an archaeologist. He's come to country X. He starts digging in the hope of finding things that will prove his theory. Bob calls him, and John tells him that he's now in country X. Bob asks him:...
prof1589's user avatar
  • 155
-1 votes
1 answer
105 views

What does "up" mean in "Up the Terriers"?

I notice the sports writer say “Up the Terriers” for a British football team. What does "up" exactly mean? Hull City 0-0 Huddersfield Town Town get things going. Up the Terriers. Twitter
Nyambek's user avatar
  • 377
3 votes
2 answers
309 views

If I want to use an infinitive as an adverb in the sentence then I can use an infinitive with any verb as an adverb?

If I want to use an infinitive as an adverb in the sentence then can I use it with any verb or specific verb? suppose I want to say " I went there to drive the car" so here to drive the car ...
Sammed's user avatar
  • 1
-2 votes
1 answer
82 views

What does "rogue for faith" mean?

It's definitely some kind of an idiom. But i haven't clue what does "rogue for faith" mean. Sry for the lack of additional information. Yes it's from Barry Lyndon. And it was pronounced ...
Strider1996's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
68 views

What does "pleasant rattle of a man" mean?

I've just watched Barry Lyndon. At the beginning Barry asked Nora if she was obliged to dance with another man and she responded: "He dances prettily, to be sure, and is a pleasant rattle of a ...
Strider1996's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
95 views

Why 'are getting' at sentence 'I'm sorry to hear that your parents are getting divorced.'? [closed]

Book Destination C1&C2, page 6: Write the verb in brackets in the correct form, present simple or present continuous, in each gap: I'm sorry to hear that your parents __________ (get) divorced. ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
0 votes
1 answer
144 views

"oral communication" vs "speech communication"

Maybe it's more of a question to linguists out here. I'm wondering if there is a difference in meaning between "oral communication" vs "speech communication". To me, both mean the ...
Diane Mik's user avatar
  • 319
4 votes
8 answers
4k views

Does "I saw a blue car and bus" mean "blue bus" or any coloured bus?

What is the outcome of any and every sentence in the following sentence format when the rules of English grammar is applied upon them. sentence format <Noun Verb Determiner Adjective Noun ...
Stechavy's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
25 views

Stress of word 'flagrant' /ˈfleɪɡrənt/ is Flagrant or FLAgrant or something else?

Stress of word 'flagrant' /ˈfleɪɡrənt/ is Flagrant or FLAGrant or something else? My problem is I don't know stress at f (Flagrant) or fleɪ (FLAgrant) (separation of sounds, because as you seen, it is ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
1 vote
2 answers
47 views

Are imperfectly constructed sentences understandable? [closed]

As an English learner, when building a sentence in my head it is almost impossible to get it out idiomatically. For example, before I knew the word "regarding" I built this sentence: "...
Giliarda Freitas's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
60 views

Is "covered wagons rolling access the prairies" wrong?

I am using Oxford's Dictonary Advanced learner + Oxford's Collocations dictionary - 10th edition - mobile application (licensed). I seen In my thought, it is covered wagons are rolling access the ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
0 votes
1 answer
123 views

What are the meanings of dot in word what show in Oxford Dictionary advanced learners for mobile?

What are the meanings of dot in word what show in Oxford Dictionary advanced learners for mobile (licensed subscription)? Example word: ability . Web version of Oxford dictionary for advanced ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
1 vote
3 answers
182 views

How to explain, "listen" has 5 sounds while its pronunciation is `/ˈlɪsn/`? Why not 4 sounds?

Book Cambridge pronunciation in Use Elementary, at Section B, item A3c In some words there are silent letters (letters with no sound). In listen, t is silent. listen 6 letters, 5 sounds +---+---+---+...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
0 votes
1 answer
84 views

Position of stress in 3-letter-abbreviation: BBC and DVD

Book "English pronunciation in use - Advance" [E1] page 40: (1) the ˌBBˈC (2) He works for the BBˈC. (3) He works for ˈBBC RAdio. Book "Oxford Word skill - intermediate - 1st edition&...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
2 votes
1 answer
120 views

Why /ˈlem.ən/ (Cambridge dictionary - UK voice) but read like /ˈlemən/ (Oxford dictionary - UK voice)?

I am learning at English Pronunciation in Use - Advanced. I seen Why /ˈlem.ən/ (Cambridge dictionary - UK voice) but read like /ˈlemən/ (Oxford dictionary - UK voice)? I feel dot . in /ˈlem.ən/ was ...
Vy Do's user avatar
  • 257
2 votes
0 answers
175 views

Why does this British speaker pronounce the word "gerund" as "/gerUND/" instead of /dʒɛrənd/?

This is from a British speaker who teaches speaking skills to millions of students. In one of his videos, he mentions the word "gerund" but he pronounces it "/gerUND/". Speaking ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,401
3 votes
2 answers
448 views

Exercise book vs. Composition book

As far as I know, in United States students don't use exercise books. Image 1. Exercise book They use composition books instead, which often have "marble" cover and bound through the fold. ...
jsx97's user avatar
  • 181
3 votes
3 answers
609 views

British or American For IELTS/TOEFL

Which one (British or American) is better for IELTS exam? What about TOEFL? I'm lerning American, is it essantial to learn British or not?
English Lerner's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
44 views

to flip the phrase around and keep the same gist?

is that grammatically accepted to flip: 1.0 "of just enhancing the film they used a lot of technology" as 2.0 "they used a lot of technology of just enhancing the film" I believe ...
Giliarda Freitas's user avatar

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